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PEST CONTROL


many pests leave behind distinctive scents. Cleaners should be trained to report unusual smells and also new noises – for instance large cockroach infestations can result in scratching noises being heard.


The presence of rats around the premises poses an immediate risk of contracting Leptospirosis. Left unchecked an infestation will increase in size and extent and once established, rats will explore their surroundings with enhanced confidence.


There is the added risk of people being bitten by different types of insects and mammals, and stress caused by the physical presence of pests.


Paul explained: “Occasionally we’ve had calls about female staff being bitten below the knee and it has turned out not to be insects but microscopic fibres from the carpets that have caused a reaction by penetrating the skin, or static electricity causing pores to shut and giving a similar reaction to insect bites. In these cases we’ve been able to advise the cleaning company to use an anti-static spray.


“Giving staff formal pest awareness training is a win-win for cleaning contractors,” Paul added, “and a good evidence to cite when tendering. This includes specialist cleaners like window cleaners who need to be made aware of the hazards caused by bird droppings, particularly pigeon waste.”


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


But Paul stressed that bundling pest control and cleaning services together in one contract, sometimes with landscaping too, is an approach that must be avoided. “Poor cleaning practices and untidy landscaping work can lead to pest infestations and this can lead to conflict and complications. Working together but with separate contracts is always the best solution.”


Normal pest control contracts for standard premises will include a minimum of eight inspections a year. Factories producing high-risk food or manufacturing pharmaceuticals will require more frequent visits. The inspections should include all common areas such as plant rooms; basements; riser cupboards; car parks and landscaped areas – all of the areas where pests could harbour and reproduce undisturbed.


When it comes to pest control, no one should rest on their laurels. A mouse can get in through a gap the width of a pencil, cockroaches can be brought in on cardboard packaging, fleas may be picked up on public transport, pigeons will make the most of those wonderfully designed architectural ledges on the outsides of buildings – and flies will just fly in.


Cleankill has been solving pest problems for commercial and domestic customers since 2005. Using the most up-to-date pest-control techniques and technology, the company keeps its


TOP TIPS TO HELP STOP INFESTATIONS:


• Arrange training for all cleaning staff from an accredited pest controller


• Change to night-time bin emptying


• Discourage customers from ‘bundling’ contracts


• Arrange for cleaning operatives and pest control technicians to meet regularly to share information


customers pest free and makes sure it is at the forefront of the industry when it comes to the use of pesticides and non-toxic pest control methodology.


As an Investor in People, all Cleankill’s staff are highly trained and offer an exceptionally fast and efficient level of service. The company is a proud member of the British Pest Control Association (BPCA), as well as being approved to ISO9001 and ISO14001. Cleankill is also fully accredited to the Altius Vendor Assessment, Safecontractor, Exor, Constructionline and Achilles Health and Safety accreditation schemes and aims to be recognised as a market leader for innovation and new pest control techniques.


www.cleankill.co.uk


Tomorrow’s Cleaning February 2016 | 53


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