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23


BUILDING PROJECTS


27 LINDEN GARDENS NOTTING HILL, LONDON


Victorian townhouse is a glass act


A neglected, empty building in west London is being converted into luxury apartments, thanks in no small way to the clever use of glass. Jess Unwin finds out more


G


lass and its ability to help create the light, airy and open-plan living spaces that define the aspirations of contemporary residential architecture has transformed what was once a neglected Victorian townhouse into a 21st-century des res.


Located in a tree-lined cul-de-sac within the Pembridge conservation area of west London’s Notting Hill, the mid-terrace property that is 27 Linden Gardens had certainly seen better days when Fruition Properties and HUB Architects took it on. The building, originally five storeys, was unoccupied after a period when its many rooms had been converted for multiple occupancy use, and was “in a condition of disrepair”, according to HUB’s Jennifer Creighton.


After planning approval, work began in November 2015 to convert the property into just four apartments. Fruition Properties’ Ross Coathup, project and design manager, reveals the interior was “completely gutted” with the removal of everything, including the floors, to enable reconstruction and reconfiguration. However, from the outside, little has changed. Coathup is keen to point out: “One of the central principles of the devel- opment is the retention of the facade.”


Fusing open-plan transparency with Victorian tradition


Creighton agrees and adds: “The design vision for number 27 is to create light and transparency within the existing Victorian facade that encompasses the new intercon- nected spaces and fuses with the traditional aspects of the building.”


ADF MAY 2017


She continues: “Primarily, we wanted to facilitate the contemporary requirements of modern living standards – more open-plan, spatial requirements. We wanted to move away from the smaller, enclosed rooms that were traditional when the building was first designed to have lots of light and space. Glass and other reflective surfaces are among the things that can make that happen.”


Using glass to partition spaces means that apartment one, a duplex spanning the lower ground and ground levels and apartment


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


PARTITIONING


Using glass to partition spaces means that apartments have a transparency that allows you to see right through from the front to the rear of the building


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