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HERBERT CRESCENT, KNIGHTSBRIDGE, LONDON


19


combine minimal design and maximum transparency,” says Malishev. For all members of the design and construction team, producing such a ground-breaking scheme was to prove a challenging task. The scheme features an array of consultants and contractors with experience in high-end residential projects, including Tim Flynn Architects producing the design, Malishev working on the glazing for the lift and Walter Lilly brought on board as main contractor.


The building originally comprised four


bedsits, which were bought by the client so that the property could be reverted back to a single Toblerone-shaped residence but all this consolidation has proved a long process. Work has only just been completed but


ADF MAY 2017


first started in August 2011 with the recon- figuration of the internal space to create an area for the lift. This also necessitated a major excavation project. The construction team dug down more than 25 metres and installed secant piling walls as a four-storey house was extended to eight levels. “We certainly pushed the boundaries,” says Steve Edwards, contracts manager for Walter Lilly. He goes on to explain: “It was quite a challenge to get a piling rig in to dig down to that depth and we required a structural rig to lift the piling rig in.” The basement work alone took around 11 months to complete and the centrepiece glass lift was two years in construction. Finding a specialist sub-contractor willing to take on the lift element was difficult due to the challenging work.


Many sub-contractors were simply afraid of this contract and refused to tender altogether, regardless of the costs


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