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PATIENT SAFETY


ANNAMARIE MCGREGOR MPHARMS, ROYAL PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT LEAD DISCUSSES HOW A SERIES OF ROADSHOWS ARE HELPING TO EMBED QUALITY AND SAFETY INITIATIVES IN PHARMACY PRACTICE.


t should go without saying that patient safety is a foremost priority in pharmacy. Eliminating variance and standardising best practice is a vital part of this. Yet we find that there are huge variations across Scotland. What can we do about this?


This is not a problem that only affects pharmacy - across healthcare systems, it is recognised that more could be done to further maintain patient safety and develop safe systems and culture. Within pharmacy however, there are two key catalysts for change. The first is the current United Kingdom Department of Health Rebalancing of Pharmacy legislation. This seeks to raise awareness of the issue, to support


16 - SCOTTISH PHARMACIST


HOW CAN WE MAKE PHARMACY SAFER I


the changes in pharmacy practice and culture and reduce inadvertent dispensing errors. (Box 1 page 14).


The second catalyst is the activities set out in the NHS Scotland PCA (P) Continuous Quality Improvement Circular (2016) 15 (Box 2 page 14)


In Scotland, embedding quality improvement is being taken forward collaboratively by RPS in Scotland, NHS Education for Scotland (NES), Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS), Community Pharmacy Scotland (CPS), the ALLIANCE, Yellow Card Centre Scotland and Directors of Pharmacy


One way these two strands are being brought together is the Pharmacy


Quality Roadshow workshop, which have been rolling out across Scotland since November 2016. They set out to improve patient safety by encouraging a safety culture and quality improvement approach to increase the reporting, learning, sharing and action by pharmacy teams by focusing on how we can reduce or prevent dispensing errors. The work was further supported in November by the launch of RPS Reporting Professional Standards for reporting, learning, sharing, taking action and review of incident. All pharmacy teams should bench-mark their practice against these standards.


Most importantly patients and the public want to trust and have


Learn from mistakes and share learning:


• Acknowledge people’s experiences of errors


• Protect people from harm through preventative measures


PHARMACY QUALITY ROADSHOWS


The key message of the Roadshows is the need for pharmacy teams to record all near-misses as a means to identify patterns and make changes to reduce risks of errors occurring.


Within the Roadshows, the workshop programme falls


>


confidence in pharmacy teams and want professional commitments to;


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