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ogies to satisfy these performance requirements. NHTSA provides justification for specifying DSRC for V2V communications, most notably that vehicles equipped with V2V must be able to receive and transmit messages from all other vehicles equipped with V2V using the same messaging standards and radio devices from multiple manufacturers. In other words, V2V cannot be successful unless there is interoperability among all V2V-equipped vehicles. However, the NPRM does leave the door open for other non-DSRC technologies for V2V communications, so long as these technolo- gies meet identified performance requirements and are interoper- able with DSRC. The Trump Administration might find that its claimed “business-


friendly” approach dictates that it back off from the V2V mandate and DSRC, or even drop the NPRM altogether. However, this conclu- sion would ignore that DSRC has been developed with the support – and significant financial resources – of vehicle OEMs and other commercial groups. In this instance, the better “business-friendly” approach may be counterintuitive: implement the proposed V2V mandate and DSRC. Another pressure point for NHTSA and the Trump Administration


is that there are significant business groups that oppose the V2V mandate and DSRC and advocate other technologies for enabling V2V, such as 5G LTE. These proponents maintain that DSRC is an out-of-date technology and would take too long to implement, even with the proposed mandate. Instead, emerging 5G technolo- gies are better able to enable V2V communications more quickly and at lower costs. (Comments on the NPRM will likely address can- didate 5G and other technologies, both their advantages and dis- advantages, vis-à-vis DSRC. These same questions are also before the Federal Communications Commission in its proceeding regard- ing permitting non-licensed operations in the 5.9 GHz Band that has been allocated for DSRC.) In sum, the NPRM likely faces added delay and a greater risk of


withdrawal under the Trump Administration. Its release at the end of the Obama Administration is no guarantee that the V2V mandate will be adopted.


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thinkinghighways.com Volume 11 Number 4


INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND ADVANCED TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT Andy Graham looks at autonomous vehicles from a long-term health perspective THE CIRCLE OF LIFE Ten years of Thinking Highways H10


PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING Bern Grush and John Niles on how to manage the vehicle fleets of the (very near) future


• MOBiNET • FLOW • UTMC • SMEV • SMART CITIES • JACOB BANGSGAARD INTERVIEW THEU COVER.indd 1


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