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Editor in Chief Kevin Borras (kevin@h3bm.com)


Art Editor Ed Miller


Associate Editor Louise Smyth (louise@h3bm.com)


Contributing Editors Richard Bishop, Tip Franklin, Bob McQueen


Bureau Chief, H3B Media North America Bob McQueen (bob@h3bm.com)


Contributors to this issue Richard Bishop, Kristyna Bronner, Carolina Burnier, Matt Curry, Gordon Feller, Alistair Gollop, Bern Grush, Greg Hatcher, Eric T Hill, Mark D Johnson, Alex Mangan, Mike McGurrin, Bob McQueen, John Niles, Shelley Row, Pete Spiller


News and Web Editor Alfie Ford (alfie@h3bm.com)


Sales Luis Hill (luis@h3bm.com)


Social Media Alfie Ford (alfie@h3bm.com)


Subscriptions. Circulation & Accounts Kerry Hill (kerry@h3bm.com)


Group Editorial Director Kevin Borras


Group CEO Luis Hill


thinkinghighways.com


Thinking Highways (ISSN No: 1753-433ZI, USPS No: 023-899) is published quarterly in March, June, September and December in two editions (Europe/RoW and North America) for GBP30/EUR40 (Europe/RoW) and US$60 (North America) per year by H3B Media, GBR, and distributed in the USA by Asendia USA, 17B S Middlesex Ave, Monroe NJ 08831. Periodicals postage paid New Brunswick, NJ and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: send address changes to Thinking Highways, 701C Ashland Ave, Folcroft PA 19032


Although due care has been taken to ensure that the content of this publication is accurate and up-to-date, the publisher can accept no liability for errors and omissions. Unless otherwise stated, this publication has not tested products or services that are described herein, and their inclusion does not imply any form of endorsement. By accepting advertisements in this publication, the publisher does not warrant their accuracy, nor accept responsibility for their contents. The publisher welcomes unsolicited manuscripts and illustrations but can accept no liability for their safe return.


© 2017 H3B Media Ltd. All rights reserved. The views and opinions of the authors are not necessarily those of H3B Media Ltd. Reproduction (in whole or in part) of any text, photograph or illustration contained in this publication without the written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.


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Thinking Highways is published by H3B Media Ltd. ISSN 1753-433ZI


Thinking Highways is a member of BPA Worldwide. BPA Worldwide Circulation Statement Jun-Dec 2015, average total qualified circulation – 17,457


Kevin Borras is editor-in-chief of Thinking Highways and editorial director/ co-founder of H3B Media. kevin@h3bm.com; thinkinghighways. com


www.thinkinghighways.com www.thinkinghighways.com


Surely the autonomous electric vehicle is the gold at the end of the rainbow? ❞


THE VIEW Foreword Thinking Kevin Borras


Can’t we live together in electric dreams?


A


s any of my Facebook friends or followers would readily tell you, the major- ity of my social media posts are about music. I recently contributed my opinions to a discussion group and, I really can’t recall why, ended up men-


tioning an album by a band that I very much doubt too many Thinking Highways readers have ever heard of – Number One Cup, who hailed from Chicago. The album in question is called People, People Why Are We Fighting? And the title made me think about something that I may entirely fabricating but I am quite con- vinced has cropped up in ITS circles over the last year or so. This whole “autonomous vehicles versus electric vehicles” thing - it’s puz-


zling me somewhat. I seem to remember there being a film out recently called Batman Vs Superman and I couldn’t think of one reason why those two superheroes would be battling each other. I am not a fan of that kind of film, I’ve not seen any of the “-man” movies, as I like to refer to them (Bat-, Super-, Spider-… Snow-) but it seemed to me that putting Batman and Superman in opposition was fundamentally, logically flawed. Not that the whole premise of Batman and Superman on their own isn’t logically shot full of holes as a pound of Swiss cheese (did you know that the holes in that type of cheese is caused by microscopic hay particles falling into the buckets that are used to collect the milk? Neither did I) but it just sounded like the convoluted market- ing ploy to end all convoluted marketing ploys. That’s clearly not the case with “AVs Vs EVs” as I shall not ever refer to it


again, but the premise here seems to be a “race” to see which of the 21st Cen- tury’s most innovative transport technologies will become mainstream first. Healthy competition is all very well but not if it’s as manufactured as this. Is there a race? And if so, why? As a journalist I’ve been fortunate enough to have driven electric vehicles and


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been a passenger in a number of autonomous vehicles and, on one glorious occasion in Luxembourg, I sat back and marvelled in extraordinary comfort as the electric vehicle in which I was being slung around a race circuit was switched into semi-autonomous mode. Surely the autonomous electric vehicle is the gold at the end of the rainbow? I have no intention of turning my foreword into an adver- tisement for Tesla but this is what Ford’s vice president of Research and Advanced Engineering Ken Washington had to say to the BBC earlier this year: “The vehicles we are going to put in our 2021 fully autonomous ride service will not have a steering wheel, they won’t have a brake pedal. This means there’s no issue with drivers having to take over control because the vehicle will know how to handle all scenarios.” So does that mean that the autonomous part of my theory will be pretty much covered in four years’ time? Electric vehicles are there already – so what’s the delay? This is The Autonomous Issue of Thinking Highways North America. Not that


it was produced autonomously (editorlessly?) but because David E Pickeral, Mike McGurrin, Bern Grush and John Niles have contributed such compelling pieces that we decided to run them consecutively to provide a collection of thought- provoking articles about the most thought-provoking ITS subject of our time.


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