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EMBEDDED VEHICLE SOFTWARE


“With the auto industry aspiring to build cars that drive themselves, adoption of embedded technologies is projected to grow at a healthy clip in the years ahead “


ogy that has graduated from vision to real- ity with the launch, at CES in January, of software for the vehicle called, rather imag- inatively, HERE Electronic Horizon. The software, which is embedded in


the car, works by pulling in map data and dynamic road event information aggre- gated in the cloud to create a simplified representation of the road ahead – rang- ing from hundreds of meters to several kilometres. It then feeds that road model to the car’s ADAS applications to enhance their performance - for example, enabling the better operation of adaptive head- lights when taking a bend or the auto- matic activation of the main beams when entering an area where deer are known to cross the road. As the industry shifts from these low


levels of automation to greater autonomy, the extended visibility the map provides becomes a more critical element of vehicle


www.thinkinghighways.com


path and strategy planning. Today, ADAS functions are mostly reliant on input from on-board sensors, such as cameras, ultra- sound and radar, which ordinarily have a sensing range of up to 150 meters. That field of vision on a motorway could well be a life-saver when faced with a critical situ- ation and it can also serve the vehicle well in a variety of regular driving scenarios. But there are plenty of driving situations where the vehicle would benefit from having a longer horizon. Firstly, consider the sensing horizon of an


automated car travelling on a motorway at 130 km/h – it’s only a few seconds. When reacting to a fairly typical situation on the


road, such as a lane closure or obstacle, this limited horizon could make for a jolting experience for the car’s occupants. And it’s a bad situation that could be made worse if sensor visibility is restricted by a truck in front, or by bad weather conditions. Then there’s the question of speed


changes. A car solely relying on on-board sensors would react to speed limit regu- lations at the moment it detects them. A simple example is of a car travelling at 150km/h on the Autobahn that has to adjust to 80km/h after having detected this new speed limit on a sign 150 meters away. To comply would require decelerat- ing at a rate of approximately 4m/s2, which


“As the industry shifts from these low levels of automation to greater autonomy, the extended visibility the map provides becomes a more critical element of vehicle path and strategy planning”


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