search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES


 If we want to encourage buying rides instead of buying cars, we need to understand the governance of massive shared fleets


aggregate situation that is suboptimal” [Cohen, p.19]. This would certainly occur with the laissez-faire fleets, but could be medi- ated with appropriate governance struc- tures tending to promote coordinated integration. Further, Cohen and Cavoli’s comment:


“…a laissez-faire approach to the arrival of AVs is likely to consolidate any existing inequality” [p.22] would apply at least as much to a predominance of personally owned vehicles as it would to laissez-faire commercial fleet management.


WHAT ELEMENTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED FOR GOVERNANCE OF AUTOMATED FLEETS? This implies that a carefully considered governance-planning model for massive SAV fleets is important. Some of the critical assumptions for such a governance model would be:


1. The three ownership models outlined in the panel above will each continue to have strong proponents; hence financial, spatial


18


and social competition will be unavoidable and ongoing. We are accustomed to this in the long-standing competition among pri- vate cars, taxis and transit, as well as in goods movement and with active transportation modes. We should plan accordingly. 2. Most governments — especially in North America — would be slow to ban or sig- nificantly limit personal vehicle ownership, notwithstanding that a few prohibit vehicles in central city zones while others employ nudges or high taxes to reduce driving or ownership. 3. The history and reasons for commercial operators to own and manage transporta- tion service fleets are significant. 4. Most local governments would be ill- disposed to acquire and operate the mas- sive fleets needed to provide a majority of regional trips in SAVs. 5. Most governments would be severely lim- ited by both budget and mandate to offer the multiple levels of service needed to per- suade middle-to-higher-income travelers to abandon personal vehicle ownership, while


still addressing social equity. 6. No specific instance of governance can work in all locations or for unlimited time spans, hence any sustainable model will need to have numerous levers to make work- ing adjustments — critically, it must be able to dial up or down the degree of intervention for reasons of both acceptability and effec- tiveness. 7. Any workable model must be widely understandable and produce results easy to measure. Because we assume that many, often mas- sive, SAV fleets will be owned and operated by private operators, the logistical methods to optimize for fleet, energy and network will be guided by cost and profit considerations on the part of the operator. We propose that government jurisdictions distribute regional, performance-based operating licenses to a regulated number of participants by auc- tion. The goal of a governance model, then, should be to ensure attention to the ele- ments that a profit regime might ignore. Below, we will propose four parameters that


www.thinkinghighways.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68