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36 Food & Drink


east, just below Granada. Her husband leaves home with his dogs at 7 in the morning to get the sheep from their compound; takes them out on to the hills for the day, following them wherever they go to find food and then brings them home again when the sun falls in the sky. The next day he does it all over again and he’s been doing it since he left school; he’s now in his 60s. He trusts the sheep to forage for what they need and he and the dogs are there to keep them safe. When his wife came to Devon however, she was very concerned about how she would explain to him the colour green and the concept of fields – leaving sheep in a lush grass-rich pasture and kept in by fences and walls. Lots of photos were taken of sheep in their fields as proof of an environment he’d never contemplated. In the kitchen, I love cooking lamb – we get ours


S


from 2 friends who rear their own sheep, one flock just outside Dittisham and the other near Slapton. It’s truly some of the best lamb we’ve ever eaten and having a freezer full of gorgeously butchered meat is a promise of luscious meals to come, from simply grilled chops


panish friends visited in January, one of whom is married to a shepherd in a village in the Alpujarras - the high, barren hills in the south


By Holly & David Jones lOcal prOduce • recipes • events


Spring is nearly here – the primroses and violets are peaking out as I write and the snowdrops are in full bloom. The first lambs are huddling by hedges with their mothers trying to get some shelter from the Devon Drizzle, for one moment a muddy reddish colour before that gets washed off and dried out and becomes cotton wool white. To a non-farmer, lambs seem to be the most bouncy of babies, jumping and pronking around. I love seeing the fields full of this ovine energy – it’s a sure sign that the warmer months are on their way.


mannafromdevon.com 01803 752943


with zingy salsa verde for a quick supper to slow- cooked shoulder with lots of onions, garlic and beans left in the oven for hours to head home to after a dog walk along the coast. Lamb seems to be the marmite of the meat world


For those


who find the meat too rich and fatty, an alternative is goat meat.


however, dividing people between those who think it’s the best thing ever and their desert island Sunday roast to those who literally can’t stomach it or even the thought of it, often because the meat is too rich and just too “lamby”. For those who find the meat too rich and


fatty, an alternative is goat meat. There is an increased supply of goat meat due to more goat’s cheese production with several farmers who raise their females for milk starting to keep their male kids for meat


or even raising goats exclusively for meat. We were contacted by a farmer doing just this on Brendon Hill on the edge of Exmoor. She is raising her (goat) kids, growing them slowly for a year to get them to a good weight before sending them to the abattoir. The meat is similar to lamb in taste, the cuts are identical and it cooks the same way but there is a lot less fat. If you get a chance to try it, do take it - it’s completely delicious! Here’s our latest favourite lamb recipe but if you want to exchange it for goat, that’s fine too –


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