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AUSTRALIA


PO Bo 294 Apollo Bay 3233 Victoria, Australia


Tel: +61 (0)401 995 501 Web: www.aaada.org.au


GENERAL MANAGER Ms Keren Lewis


E: secaada@ozemail.com.au


NATIONAL BOARD MEMBERS President


Dawn Davis (Victoria) T: +61 (0)408 530 259


Vice Presidents


Andrew Simpson (NSW) T: +61 (0)404 051 999 simpson@casuarinapress.com.au


Christopher Hughes (QLD) T: +61 (0)430 123 240 chris@theantiqueguild.com.au


Treasurer


Peter Quigley (South Australia) T: +61 (0)418 814 287 info@megawandhogg.com


New South Wales Delegates Josef Lebovic


T: +61 (0)2 9663 4848 josef@joseflebovicgallery.com


Tasmanian Delegate Peter Woof


T: +61 (0)3 6391 9191


Victorian Delegates Peter Valentine


T: +61 (0) 418 511 626


peter@valentinesantiques.com.au Graeme Davidson


T: +61 (0) 408 659 249 Western Australian Delegate


John Brans (Western Australia) T: +61 (0)8 9384 7300 john@bransantiques.com


Australian Antique & Art Dealers’ Association T


he Australian Antique & Art Dealers’ Association (AAADA) was formed in 1992 and currently has 103 members


throughout Australia.. Te local State chapters hold meetings on a regular basis and several times a year send delegates to meetings of the AAADA National Board, held alternately in Melbourne and Sydney. Keren Lewis, the AAADA's General Manager, liaises closely with the State chapters, some of which have antecedents going back to the 1950s, and which act as administrative branches at the state level. Applicants for membership of the AAADA apply by nominating their field of expertise and are assessed on their knowledge. Tey must also comply with conditions relating to the description and display of stock items and must comply with the AAADA Code of Conduct in their dealings with the public. Applicants who are accepted are listed in the annual handbook, on the AAADA website and become eligible for advantageous terms in relation to a range of commercial benefits. Tese include an insurance scheme, discounted journal subscriptions and credit card merchant fees. Many also exhibit at the AAADA fairs and receive newsletters (both national and local) along with bulletins on the latest developments in academia, regulations, legislation and other current issues affecting the trade.


Australia’s pre-eminent Antiques and Fine


Art Fairs are run by the AAADA and are held each year in Melbourne around April/May and in Sydney around August/September. Both fairs have exhibiting members from all states and are of sufficient prestige and importance to attract overseas interest. At the educational level, there are lecture/ seminar series run separately in Sydney and Melbourne conducted by the New South Wales and Victorian chapters for the general public. Tese are held in the shop premises of the conveners, and are very much “hands on” learning experiences for the attendees. Australia is a net importer of antiques and the dealers must travel widely around the globe to source their required stock. Tere is a high usage of IT resources and the internet for both buying and selling, the necessity arising both from Australia’s distance from sources of stock and the size of the country. Whilst the tyranny of distance is an ever


present issue in this country and changes in taste dictating buying patterns, the antiques market is continually challenged. Encouragingly, trends


here in Australia,


are working towards antiques and older art with new collectors buying specific items to achieve “the look” thus showing great pride in their heritage.


16 | CINOA.org


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