This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
UNITED KINGDOM


BADA F


BADA


14 Dufferin Street, London EC1Y 8PD, United Kingdom


T: +44 (0)20-7589 4128 E: info@bada.org W: www.bada.org


PRESIDENT Lady Borwick, MP


CHAIRMAN OF THE COUNCIL Michael Cohen


VICE CHAIRMAN Robert Young


TREASURER Mrs Kaye Michie


Council


Daniel Bexfield Mrs Laura Bordignon Lennox Cato Richard Coles


Redmond Finer Alastair Gibson Denzil Grant Jeremy Green


Richard Marchant Nicholas Mullany Frank Partridge Peter Petrou Ian Walker


Regional Representatives


(South East) Christopher Buck (South West) Simon Powell


(Midlands & Wales) Post vacant (Eastern) Jeremy Green


(Northern) Louise Phillips (Scotland) Emma Hawkins


Chief Executive Marco Forgione


Secretary General Mark Dodgson


BADA has helped innovate and drive the


industry forward. By establishing initiatives such as BADA Auctions and through robust lobbying and advocacy on behalf of their members, BADA help provide a fairer, transparent environment for buyers, collectors and dealers. Te annual BADA Fair, held in March on London's King's Road, is a unique environment where 100 BADA members exhibit the finest objects in specially created pavilions that form


144 | CINOA.org


ounded in 1918, BADA is the aspirational membership association of leading fine art and antique dealers. Members are


elected in recognition of their expertise, integrity, experience and quality of their stock. Many BADA members are recognised internationally as experts in their field. BADA members provide one of the largest


resources of knowledge and insight to be found in the world of fine art and antiques. Many museum and private


collections of


international significance contain pieces purchased from BADA members. Membership is closely monitored. Before any


proposed new member may be recommended to the Council, written reports are scrutinised by a membership committee and each member undergoes an annual confirmation of his membership. BADA has a stringent code of practice overseen by the Council. Any dispute between a member and their customer can be taken to the Association’s free, independent arbitration service.


a quality, luxury retail environment attracting leading buyers, collectors and designers. BADA Friends is a community of over 600 people interested in fine art and antiques. Te Friends has a vibrant calendar of visits, talks and masterclasses in exclusive venues. BADA's website (www.bada.org) is a


wonderful source of advice, guidance and information. It features a dynamic gallery of thousands of items available for sale from BADA members, information on caring for works of art and antiques, a calendar of members’ exhibitions and a section devoted to the BADA Friends. BADA's Cultural and Educational Trust


supports West Dean College where it offers scholarships


to students who undertake


courses in the restoration of ceramics, furniture and metalwork.


BADA’s consumer advice service includes: • A free current list of members • Recommended Service Providers • Advice on experts to consult • BADA Arbitration Service • BADA Assessment Service • Export assistance – BADA Antiques Declaration scheme


• Help in understanding Artist’s Resale Right (droit de suite)


• Te Care of Antiques & Works of Art booklet


Information about: • Purchasing BADA gift vouchers • Buying & Selling Antiques • Specialist packers and shippers • •


Antiques courses Joining BADA Friends


• Valuing, securing & insuring your antiques • Te BADA Fair and other antiques fairs


Members of the public can also request a written opinion about any item they already possess. Tere is a fee for this service. For further details contact BADA.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244