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Capital Idea Social Networking Funds Local Business


Community Sourced Capital (CSC) is a newly formed lender headquartered in Seattle, Washington, that aims to apply the crowdsourcing model to encourage the growth of locally owned businesses. “The hardest part is often not attracting shoppers once the project is off the ground,” explains co-founder Casey Dilloway, “but securing capital to get it started.” CSC’s objective is to harness the power of the connections that tie lo- cal people together—both via social media and in the physical world—to find people willing to loan money to small local businesses. They may initially connect through Community SourcedCapital.com.


Lenders make funds available in $50 blocks up to a maximum of $250 per project, and are acknowledged by the receipt of a pale-blue square card bearing the CSC logo, which identifies them as “Squareholders”. The funds are then made available to borrowers at zero interest, and loans are paid back at a designated rate based on the company’s revenue. CSC makes loans of up to $50,000.


Source: Yes magazine


globalbriefs


Giving Group Millennials Devote Time, Talent, Treasure


Much is rightly written about how and why “millennials”, or “Generation Y”—the young people heading into the 21st century—spend their time and money. This generation is redefining the way we think about business, and conscious consumerism is now its own form of philanthropy. This age group is leading the charge by extending the premise of a moral compass to for-profit enterprises and looking for ever-more meaningful opportuni- ties to have an impact. The trend carries fresh implications for the non- profit sector, too, because millennials lead the way in forwarding worthy causes. When The Case Foundation partnered with Achieve, a thought leader in non- profit millennial engagement, to produce the Millennial Impact Report, researchers surveyed more than 2,500 millennials ages 20 to 35. They found that last year, 83 percent gave a financial gift to an organization supporting a cause that resonates with their interests. Seventy-three percent volunteered for a cause that they were passionate about or felt created impact, and 70 percent are raising money for their causes both online and offline.


Holy Eco-Crisis! Deadly Fungus Destroying Bat Colonies


White-nose syndrome, a disease spread by a soil fungus, G. destructans, and thought to have been carried to North America from Europe, is devastating bat colonies in the U.S. and Canada. First identified in 2006 in a population of com- mon little brown bats in a cave 150 miles north of New York City, the malady has claimed 98


percent of the bat population there by causing them to awaken prematurely from their normal hibernation and then die from lack of food and exhaustion. A single reproductive female little brown bat can eat her weight in insects


each night. A recent Canadian study valued crops potentially lost to insects that would otherwise be devoured by bats at $53 billion a year. Without the bats to keep insect numbers down, farmers may turn to greater use of pesticides.


Source: Telegraph.co.uk


Bamboozled Bamboo Fabric a Product of Greenwashing


At least one dealer in sustainable products has taken a stand against bamboo fabric, which most people associate with bamboo lumber, a rapidly renewable resource that requires fewer pesticides to grow than other crops. Laura Mathews, of Eco Promotional Products, Inc., in Washington state, cites the Federal Trade Commission’s report: “The truth is, most bamboo textile products, if not all, really are rayon, which typically is made using environmentally toxic chemicals. While different plants, including bamboo, can be used as a source material to create rayon, there’s no trace of the original plant in the finished rayon product.”


Mathews says that her company has discontinued selling bamboo clothing and all other items made from bamboo fabric. She notes, “It’s the responsibility of everyone to vet these and other similar terms to ensure that the eco-friendly prod- uct you’re putting your purchasing power behind is actually eco-friendly.”


Source: EcoPromotionsOnline.com 14 Hudson County NAHudson.com


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