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Have you been


actually a pie chart of how much of Japan is Japan.


CROSSWORDLUNCHTIME


I couldn't believe it today, when I came home and was told by my wife that my 5-year-old son wasn't actually mine.


She says that I need to pay more attention when picking him up from school.


Te Japanese flag is


I accidentally let it slip I'd lied about my degree in Human Biology.


Me and my big face-hole. Across


4 First name of nemesis of the school dinner (5)


5 Victoria Wood's sitcom set in Manchester factory (12)


6 Dan once spoiled the milk, but on Ken carried, eating his dairy snack. (7)


9 Japanese packed lunch (5) 10 £3 will get you one of these at Tesco, Sainsbury's and Superdrug (4,4)


12 Sweet snack between breakfast and lunch. (9)


16 One of the four fundamental states of matter, with little or no food to accompany (6,5)


17 Te Earl's lunchtime invention would become Britain's favourite (8)


18 First word of Adrian Chiles' former BBC Two business program (7)


Down 1 Where Linford Christie always keeps his snack (8)


2 Ring this infant cheese (7) 3 French baton often used to club fillings (8)


7 Melanie Sykes and Gino D'Acampo invite you to their TV dinner (4,2,5)


8 Late Lunch launched the careers of these two female presenters whose fame has recently risen thanks to BBC show.


11 Lunchtime food combo fit for farm workers? (10)


13 PepsiCo plays Daddy to Walkers Crisps' US equivalent (4)


14 Caesar and Waldorf both put their name to this dish. (5)


15 Slang word for lunch is the same name as an unbaked square biscuit / cake (6)


6/October 2013/outlineonline.co.uk


A random man came up to me the other day and


threw a handful of Lego at me!


I really didn't know what to make of it.


always name-dropping. But I'm not as bad as my best friend Tom Cruise.


I keep getting told I’m


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