This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
This is an extract from a larger article in Sports Management's Olympic Issue, Q3, 2012


www.sportsmanagement.co.uk/2012


The Aquatics Centre features two 50m pools and a 25m pool


More than 180,000 tiles were used in the pools The top tier of the Stadium


was built using surplus gas pipes. This upper tier can be dismantled after the Games


AQUATICS CENTRE DIVING SWIMMING (OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC) MODERN PENTATHLON SYNCHRONISED SWIMMING


DESIGN AND BUILD: Designed by Zaha Hadid, the Aquatics Centre’s wave-like roof, clad with 30,000 individual sections of red lauro hardwood from Brazil, proved to be one of the most complex engineering challenges of the Olympic Park big build. Its skeletal structure rests on just two concrete supports at the northern end of the building and


ISSUE 3 2012 © cybertrek 2012


supporting wall at its southern end. The venue features a 50m compe- tition pool, a 25m competition diving pool, a 50m warm-up pool and a ‘dry’ warm-up area for divers. It has a seat- ing capacity of 17,500,


AFTER THE GAMES: The Aquatics Centre will be transformed into a facility for the local community, clubs and schools, as well as elite swimmers – attracting an anticipated 800,000 visitors a year.


The pools have moveable booms and floors to create different pool sizes. The two temporary wings will be removed – reducing capacity to 2,500 – although it will be possible to increase the capacity for competitions. It will also feature a crèche, a café and a new public plaza. The venue’s operator after the Games will be Greenwich Leisure Limited.


Read Leisure Management online leisuremanagement.co.uk/digital 31


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