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Singapore ››Port Guide 1


Compact Singapore maybe a one-city country but you’ll find plenty to pack into a visit here, from shopping to culture to a surprisingly vibrant nightlife Words Debbie Ward


S


ingapore is a tiny island state about the size of the Isle of Wight, situated just off the southern tip of


Malaysia. It’s established itself as a major financial and hub and a key cruise port, with a new terminal close to completion.


WHAT TO DO/SEE Get your bearings with a river cruise (rivercruise.com.sg) from Boat Quay or by taking in the view from Mount Faber where you can also catch a cable car to Singapore’s playground island, Sentosa (sentosa.com.sg). On Sentosa take your pick of organised fun from golf to luge rides to an aquarium or simply flop somewhere on its three kilometres of beach. Alternatively, leafy relaxation can be found in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve – a rainforest in the heart of the city – or the Botanic Gardens (sbg.org.sg), home to thousands of orchids.


64 | APRIL/MAY 2012


Orchard Road is the hub for malls


and designer boutiques while Arab Street in Kampong Glam district is popular for bazaar browsing. Try a Night Safari at the Singapore Zoo (nightsafari.com.sg).


WHERE TO DRINK A cocktail at Raffles (raffles.com) is a must. The mansion hotel has a history that warrants its own museum and the Singapore Sling was invented in its Long Bar. Another heritage building in


which to enjoy a tipple is Chijmes (pronounced Chimes, chijmes.com. sg), a former convent that now houses shops, bars and restaurants. Blues–orientated Crazy Elephant (crazyelephant.com) at Clarke Quay is among the city’s other live music venues. For martinis with a relaxing riverside setting visit Boat Quay’s BQ (bqbar.com), which is housed in a 1920s shop house.


WHERE TO EAT At Clarke Quay and Boat Quay you’ll find plenty of smart riverside bars and restaurants. Visit Singapore’s ethnic districts – Chinatown, Little India and the Malay-Arab quarter of Kampong Glam – where you can take your pick of restaurants and hawker stalls. For a city view, choose the Shangri-La hotel’s BLU restaurant and bar (shangri-la.com), or The Jewel Box on Mount Faber which has five gem-themed dining venues (mountfaber.com.sg).


WHERE TO STAY Marina Bay Sands (marinabaysands. com) iand Resorts World Sentosa (rwsentosa.com)i, are big, showy resorts; at the other end of the scale, boutique hotels include design- conscious Wanqz (wangzhotel.com) and the sexy five-star hotel The Scarlet in Chinatown (thescarlethotel. com), a heritage building.


››FACT FILE Population 5,100,000


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Climate Singapore is warm and humid year round, with the temperature almost never dropping below 20°C, even at night, and usually climbing to 30°C during the day.


LANGUAGES English, Malay, Chinese, Tamil


Time GMT + 8


Currency Singapore dollar (SGD)


Cruise ships dock either at the Singapore Cruise Centre (SCC), or (for bigger ships) the container ship pier.


This page Take a river cruise for a great view of Singapore Facing page The view from Dong Baek Island, Busan


CRUISE-INTERNATIONAL.COM


PHOTOS: CUNARD/KOREA TOURISM ORGANIZATION


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