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6 Adventure Cruising ToBoldlyGo


Saga’s Quest for Adventure offers the chance to voyage off the beaten track whilst enjoying a stylish, yacht-like ambience


››Quest for Adventure highlights


● Flights included (where applicable)


● Explore lesser-known and exotic ports of call


● Expert lecturers ● Up to fi ve shore excursions included, depending on the length of your cruise


● Small ship cruising with only 446 passengers


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uest for Adventure sets sail on her inaugural cruise on 6 May, 2012. The renamed Saga Pearl II is small by today’s standards, but that makes her


ideal for adventure cruising. As Captain Wesley Dunlop explains: “Her small size means I can take her to remote and unusual places. And if we see a pod of dolphins or a striking stretch of coastline, I will change course to investigate!” The ship will retain her exquisite food, excellent service and friendly crew, but will be sailing under a new name to better refl ect her adventurous itineraries. The 446-passenger ship has a yacht-like ambience with stylish nautical fi ttings, and one of the largest libraries afl oat, packed with more than 3,400 books, DVDs, computers and comfy chairs. The ship’s Sundowner Bar is the perfect spot to


relax with friends – especially in fi ne weather, and Shackleton’s, the ship’s main bar, is perfect for pre- dinner cocktails. The cuisine refl ects the far-fl ung region you fi nd yourself in, and the ship has a choice of two superb dining venues.


On most cruises you will fl y out to join Quest for


Adventure so you can start exploring straight away. And the best bit – fl ights are included. The ship will be starting close to home for her inaugural cruise: setting sail from Southampton on an eight-day journey round the British Isles and Ireland, visiting the Isle of Man, Londonderry, Tobermory, Dublin, Cobh and Guernsey, before arriving in Dover.


6 | SAGA.CO.UK/CRUISES


Adventures ahead Quest for Adventure then sets sail to explore the more remote corners of the earth, from the polar ice cap to West Africa and jungles of Costa Rica via Nova Scotia. In fact, there are very few parts of the world the ship doesn’t visit. For example, you could fi nd yourself exploring a medieval monastery in Russia, walking through virgin rainforest in Ghana or discovering a Mayan temple in Mexico.


In Latin America get set to cruise through the


mangrove forests of Costa Rica, meet the Embera Indians of Panama and explore Venezuela’s vibrant capital, Caracas. Meanwhile in North America, some of Canada’s smallest provinces, the Maritimes, are also some of its most beautiful, with rugged coastlines and quaint fi shing villages. Northern Europe is best seen on a cruise, whether you want to experience Iceland’s geological wonders, the Baltic’s elegant cities or Norway’s serene fjords. Quest will visit the lesser-known ports such as


Seydisfjordur, one of the most picturesque villages in Iceland, and Murmansk in Russia’s far north.


Expert knowledge Up to fi ve shore excursions are included in the price of each voyage, as well as expert lectures from speakers including include Canon Ian Ainsworth-Smith, a classical and Middle Eastern specialist; Graham Archer, an historian and former senior member of the British Foreign Service; and Dr Peter Cattermole, a geologist and vulcanologist.


Main Discover the breathtaking Pulpit Rock on the Lysefjord Above (inset) Chichen Itza Above Make the acquaintance of more exotic inhabitants


APRIL/MAY 2012


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