This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BIG SCREENS


‘match-day experience’. Today’s fans not only expect to be en-


G


tertained on the pitch but off it too, in state-of-the art stadia bristling with the latest multi-media technology. From jum- bo screens to concourse and handheld devices, media is being used to engage and entertain fans at every opportunity. In the current economic conditions


however, venues are increasingly look- ing to see how they can make this new media investment pay its way. Outright capital purchase of technology is hard to


TV monitors in stadium concourses engage spectators away from the pitch


one are the days when a cold cup of tea and a meat pie at half-time was the best a foot- ball fan could expect from a


SCREEN TEST


Robin Currie advises on how in-stadia digital solutions, such HD concourse TV, jumbo screens and digital perimeter advertising boards can deliver maximum return on investment


finance, which means it’s hard to justify. Because of this, rights holders need to look at solutions that pay for themselves, even in the short term. The business model at Sports Revolu-


tion has been to partner with BEKO to subsidise the deployment of more than 1,000 screens in stadia across the UK – creating a brand-enhancing platform that generates revenue and provides match-day entertainment. Obviously this is a model that only suc-


ceeds if the screen content can genuinely engage the fans and build an audience that can attract advertising revenue. It’s essential to ensure every aspect of


the screen offering is compelling, both commercially for the club, but also in terms of how it enhances fans’ match-day experience. For example, it’s not enough to install the latest screens if the content doesn’t connect with the fans. A one- size-fits-all approach simply won’t work. Fans go to matches to watch games,


not ads, so it’s important to ensure the screens are full of content they want to


36 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


watch – such as player interviews, crucial club information, scores and statistics. It’s all about the technology boosting, not interrupting, their match-day enjoyment. This approach has the potential to cre-


ate a virtuous circle. If fans, engaged by the content, are watching the screens, brands are keen to advertise on them. It’s also worth noting that some pro-


viders have got it wrong in the past from the other side, offering interest- ing, tailored content, but on poor quality screens. The right model requires suffi- cient investment in both the content and the front-end technology. Working in partnership with clubs’


media departments is also essential to creating a joined-up communication platform that complements each club’s existing media channels.


Camera-facing screens – digital perimeter advertising In addition to ensuring stadia concourse TV gets it right in terms of the screens and the content, rights holders should


Issue 2 2011 © cybertrek 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84