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On the Water ON THE WATER


here are a vast number of companies manufacturing antifouling products but how do you know which antifoul is best suited to your type of boat and the type of cruising or racing you enjoy?


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Fowling on the underside of your boat can significantly affect the performance of your vessel by decreasing the vessel’s efficiency to slide through the water. This will have an adverse effect on fuel economy and lead to the vessel feeling unresponsive. Lack of attention to heavy fouling can eventually damage the hull’s surface and lead to costly repairs. The degree of fouling experienced by boat owners can greatly vary, depending on conditions such as the water salinity, temperature, flow rate and the amount of sunlight to which the hull is exposed. Most antifouls are designed to cope with an array of conditions but some antifouls are particularly suited to certain applications. For the cruising sailor, the popular choice is


by Jamie Coombes – Pedros Yacht Refinishing.


If you haven’t already had your sailing yacht, motorboat or numerous other types of craft lifted out of the water for annual checks and maintenance yet, you soon will! This brings us to this month’s subject of antifouling.


‘polishing’ or ‘self-eroding’ antifoul. This product is softer than others and the movement of the vessel through the water will gently erode the coatings, releasing fresh growth deterring chemicals/biocides. Providing the coatings are applied at the correct thickness this antifoul is very effective and benefits from little maintenance. This type of antifoul is unsuitable for vessels on drying moorings.


Another popular choice of antifoul is a hard finish product. These antifouls will leach the biocides from within the paint or binder. Due to their harder finish, this antifoul is suitable for drying moorings. The passing of the vessel through the water does not erode the antifouling, it can also be burnished to provide low drag efficient surface for racing sailors. These Hard antifouls are suitable for motor vessels, with many companies offering products for vessels capable of speeds up to 60 knots.


Unit 25 Osprey Quay Portland Marina 


01305 826220/01803 845475 www.pedrosyachtrefinishing.co.uk


The Leading Yacht Painter & Repairer in the South West; specialising in high quality topsides painting, osmosis treatment & prevention, insurance approved repair centre; from a small repair to a total refit - the only Blakes and AWLGRIP Approved Centres in the area. Our services include:-


■ High quality AWLGRIP yacht painters ■ Structural & cosmetic GRP Repairs ■ Installation of bow and stern thrusters ■ Dinghy Repair & Restoration ■ Osmosis treatment using the HotVac system ■ Osmosis prevention ■ Varnish work ■ Boatyard Repairs ■ Gel Coat Peeler ■ Marine Paints & Coatings


The West Country’s Leading Yacht Rigger & Mast Manufacturer Extensive range of mast spares and fittings, regional Selden dinghy & yacht centre. www.spars.co.uk Unit 25 Osprey Quay, Portland Marina, Portland Dorset DT5 1DX - 01305 826220/01803 843322


Traditional/soft antifouling are based on long established technology. Their simple resin formulation means the active ingredients are dispersed along with the binder, offering good protection at an economical price. Traditional antifoul should not be sanded and should not be over coated with hard or erodible antifouling, unless a sealer coat is used, such as Underwater Primer. An increasingly popular choice of antifouling is Coppercoat. Developed in the 1980’s and available from 1991, Coppercoat offers boat owners documented fouling protection for 10 years and often more. Coppercoat is the combination of a specially developed solvent-free epoxy resin and high purity (99%) copper. Each litre of resin is impregnated with 2 kilos of ultra-fine spherical copper powder, the maximum allowed


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