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EDUCATION


Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity


N


Diversity Employer


Cornell University Cornell University’s Diversity Vision, “Open Doors, Open Hearts, and Open Minds” can be found here: www.cornell.edu/ diversity/history/statement. cfm.


Marie Garland Director Faculty & Staff Diversity Cornell University


oting that women’s enrollment at busi- ness schools has plateaued at 30%, while


the numbers have peaked at 44% in medical and law schools, Catalyst, University of Michigan Business School, and the Center for the Education of Women at the University of Michigan sought to gain insight into the busi- ness school environment, career outcomes of MBA graduates, and why more women aren’t pursuing MBAs. Both women and men are satisfied with


their business school experience (women: 95%, men: 95%), citing the four most reward- ing activities as: n Interactions with other students/ involvement in activities n Curriculum and class size Opportunity for group work; use of case studies n Acquiring managerial and business


skills to:


African-American women are more likely n Feel excluded in business school, with


45% finding the environment to be overly ag- gressive and competitive. n Attribute women’s low enrollment in


business school to a lack of encouragement from employers (59%), compared to 39% of white women. n Suggest increasing overall diversity as a


means of recruiting women to business schools (93% vs. 49% white women). Most MBAs are satisfied with their post-


MBA career. Women are less satisfied with certain aspects of their work experience, in- cluding the level of support they receive from their employers. Male and female graduates offer strategies


for increasing women’s enrollment in busi- ness schools: n Feature more women business leaders as role models (men: 77%; women: 87%) n Involve women students and faculty in recruitment (men: 69%; women: 71%) n Hire more women faculty (men: 42%; women: 63%) n Increase overall diversity (men: 42%; women: 57%) n Evaluate faculty on diversity (men: 36% women: 51%)


Recommendations For Business Schools n Aggressively recruit women and women faculty n Highlight the value of a top-tier business school education n Improve the environment n Features women executives from diverse backgrounds


Recommendations For Business Organizations n Identify and aggressively recruit women through personalized recruiting, mentoring, and financial support n Demonstrate commitment and support of women at the highest levels of leadership in companies n Improve the inclusivity of business environments and provide structured career support to women Women and the MBA: Gateway to Op-


portunity was sponsored by a consortium of 13 leading companies: BP Amoco plc, The Chase Manhattan Corporation, Citigroup, Cummins Engine, Deloitte & Touche LLP, Eli Lilly, Equity Group Investments, Ford, Kraft Foods, McKinsey & Co., Motorola, Procter & Gamble, and Whirlpool. The following business schools partici-


pated in this survey: Columbia University Graduate School of Business; Dartmouth College, Amos Tuck School; Duke Univer- sity, The Fuqua School of Business; John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA; MIT Sloan School of Manage- ment; New York University, Stern School of Business; Stanford Graduate School of Business; University of California at Berke- ley, Haas School of Management; Univer- sity of Chicago Graduate School of Busi- ness; The University of Michigan Business School; University of Pennsylvania, Whar- ton School of Business; and the University of Virginia, The Darden School.


Source: catalystwomen.org


44 PROFESSIONAL WOMAN’S MULTICULTURAL MAGAZINE


CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF DIVERSITY


WWW.PROFESSIONALWOMANMAG.COM


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