This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Above: Charles Kaman stands with his test rig and servo flap rotor blades. The test rig was made from a 1933 Pontiac and a Dodge truck rear axle. The servo flaps can be scene approximately two thirds of the way out on the blades


Below: This U.S. Navy K-225 was equipped with a Boeing 502-2 turbine engine and made the first flight of a turbine powered helicopter on December 11, 1951. It is now on display at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.


Photos: Courtesy of Kaman Aerospace


LARGELY DUE TTO HIS PERSISTENCE AND RESOLVE CHARLES KAMAN HAD BEEN ABLE TO SELL THREE K-225S TO THE MILITARY, TWO TO THE NAVY AND ONE TO THE COAST GUARD.


another larger more powerful version, the K-225, was certified later that year. Unfortunately the crop dusting market along with domestic and foreign sales did not progress as hoped. A total of only eleven K- 225s were produced, one of which was sold to Turkey and became the first helicopter to fly in that country (Kaman, 1985).


Largely due to his persistence and resolve Charles Kaman had been able to sell three K-225s to the military, two to the Navy and one to the Coast Guard.


While not a sizeable contract even in the


1940s, this at least kept the company going for a short while and got their foot in the door to military sales. In 1949 the Marine Corps was looking for an observation helicopter and Kaman Aircraft submit- ted the HOK-1 as their proposal. The Navy was impressed enough with it to place an order for four helicopters in 1950. From this order was born what would arguably be Kaman’s most successful line of helicopters, the H-43. Over 400 H-43 aircraft, including several variants, were produced between 1951 and 1967. Starting with the HTK-1 (later redesignated as TH-43E), a Navy trainer version, and the HOK-1 (later redesignated as OH-43) for the Marine Corps, production extended to the


ROTORCRAFTPROFESSIONAL 32


HUK-1 (later redesignated as UH-43C), a Navy utility version (Mutza, 1998). In 1952, Kaman Aircraft modified an HTK to be flown via remote control for a Navy funded program. This


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52