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tain basics one should look for. In the United States there are literally only three or four companies that provide this service. First and foremost look at their staff. Have the company provide biographies for its instructors. You will find wide disparities in actual hands on experience as SAR opera- tors. The better companies will employ staff that in their “real jobs” per- forms these types of rescues on a daily basis, if not multiple times per shift. What type of platform is being used should weigh in on your decision. Rather it be hoisting, short haul, rescue swimmer deployment, firefighting, or fast rope each helicopter has its own operating characteristics. I can assure you from past experience, a Bell 412 and AW-139 are two complete- ly different aircraft when used in this rescue role. Inquire into what types aircraft the trainers have experience on. If the opportunity arises send crewmembers to the Goodrich Hoist


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