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IT IS STILL FALLING UPON THE


OPERATORS TO CREATE AND IMPLE- MENT A TRAINING PROGRAM THAT WILL ACCOMPLISH THIS. TODAY MORE AND MORE OPERATORS ARE TURNING TO HEMES SCENARIO-BASED TRAINING AS A MAJOR STEP IN PROVIDING THE MUCH NEEDED PILOT AND CREW MEM- BER TRAINING TO SUCCESSFULLY ACCOMPLISH THE MISSION.


In scenario based training the pilot and crewmem- ber educational process begins with a solid foundation of piloting skills, aeronautical knowledge, EMS related aviation knowledge, AMRM to include team proce- dures, and historical information on accident preven- tion. As a side note this criteria has now become the basis for our safety culture within this industry. A successful scenario based program would include elements of the following list. This is in addition to the FAA requirements already in place for aeronautical and aircraft systems pilot training. The curriculum below mirrors in part EMS pilot training standards already in place through CAMTS (Commission on the Accreditation of Medical Transport Services) and a Recommended Practice of the AMSAC (Air Medical Safety Advisory Council)


EMS SPECIFIC PILOT TRAINING Pilot Ground Training-EMS Specific Operations


- Judgment and Decision making - Risk Assessment and Management - Human Factors Management - Preflight and in flight stress management - all phases of flight –


- Workload Management and Delegation - Cockpit Distractions and Task Saturation – Multi-tasking - Situational Awareness - Air Medical Resource Management (AMRM) - Inadvertent Instrument Meteorological Conditions Procedures - Shift change and crew briefing procedures - light requests - types of and response procedures - Pre-launch and en-route communications, weather checks, & A/C procedures


- High recon, low recon, landing, shutdown, patient loading and unloading procedures


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