This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ROTORCRAFT PIONEERS


Charles H. KAMAN


BY BRAD MCNALLY


An essential characteristic of anyone starting out in a new venture is determi- nation and no one in the rotorcraft industry better exemplifies this than Charles Kaman. In the mid 1940s, working in the emerging helicopter industry with an unproven idea and little financial support, he was able to perse- vere despite many challenges and estab- lish a successful helicopter company. The hard work of the team that he assem- bled led to major advancements in heli- copter design and the development of several successful production helicopter models. Largely due to his determina- tion, the company he founded still exists today with a long list of impressive


accomplishments. Charles Kaman was born in


Washington, DC in 1919. From a young age he had aspirations to be a pilot. However, at the age of eight he was told by his family doctor that due to the loss of hearing in one ear, which had been caused by an infection from a tonsillec- tomy when he was four, he would not be able to be a pilot and would instead be an aeronautical engineer (Kaman, 1985). He excelled in school and true to the doctor’s word began building model air- planes out of balsa wood and tissue paper for a school sponsored competition. In high school, one of his rubber band motor powered models set a world


29


ROTORCRAFTPRO.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52