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- Wind considerations – en-route and at destination - Post flight procedures - aircraft and mission requirements


- Crew de-brief procedures - Flat Light and White Out training


If the company is fortunate to have a flight simu- lator/flight training device or contract with a simulator provider the following subjects must be part of that curriculum as well. If possible interactive sessions with pilots and medical crews should be incorporated into the scenarios that are being presented.


FLIGHT SIMULATOR/FLIGHT TRAINING DEVICE FLIGHT TRAINING


- Judgment and Decision making - Workload Management and Delegation - Cockpit Distractions and Task Saturation – Multi-tasking - Situational Awareness


- Flight controls and hydraulic system. - Operating limitations.


- Emergency and malfunction procedures - IIMC Procedures


Just as operators of large commercial aircraft have learned over the years, the more realistic the training, the better the outcome will be when an actual event happens. The advantage of having simulators for training unlike an actual aircraft in a training role, the simulator can be taken to finality and the lessons of failure to perform properly can be learned without damage to the aircraft or occupants of the aircraft.


In the first part of this year, the renowned US Airways pilot Capt C B “Sully” Sullenberger retired from Part 121 commercial flying to concentrate his efforts on establishing effective scenario based training for pilots. He is acutely aware of what is lacking in preparing pilots for a real world mission and believes that because of his recent experience on


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