This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INDUSTRY INFORMATION REVELANT TO YOUR BUSINESS U.S. State Department


Accepts Modernized S-61™ Helicopters for Use in Afghanistan


Sikorsky Aerospace Services


recently announced that the U.S. State Department has accepted the first two modern- ized S-61™ aircraft that will support missions for the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan. Sikorsky Aerospace Services (SAS) is the aftermarket divi- sion of Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp.


The U.S. State Department


has entered into a five-year indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) purchase agreement for up to 110 mod- ernized S-61 aircraft for pas- senger and cargo transport mis-


sions in support of its world- wide operations. The accepted aircraft will now undergo com- pletion by SAS with specialized mission equipment to meet U.S. State Department require- ments before being deployed this fall. “The U.S. State


Department’s acceptance of these first two modernized S-61 aircraft marks a major milestone in the launch of the S-61T™ modernization program. The S-61T helicopter will meet the needs of customers worldwide, and we are excited about how much interest this aircraft has generated,” said David Adler, President of Sikorsky Aerospace Services. “As the State Department pursues worldwide aviation missions, we remain fully committed to supporting


their helicopter requirements.” The modernized S-61T heli- copter will incorporate key upgrades that include composite main rotor blades (CMRB), modular wiring harness, and an optional state-of-the-art glass cockpit – all of which dramati- cally improve aircraft supporta-


bility. The S-61T helicopter modernization will also add lift capability as well as enhance speed. Additional features will be incorporated to reduce pilot fatigue and reduced mainte- nance requirements for increased safety.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52