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and recoil directions. One widely circulated but erro-


neous belief about the 645 engine is that its introduction replaced the 567 in the EMD product line. That is only true of U.S. domes- tic locomotive production; the 567 engine continued to be built for many years after the 645 en- tered service, although in 645 crankcases. Applications of these 567 engines included U.S. mili- tary contracts that called for use of a “proven product,” as well as certain marine, industrial, and export orders that required parts compatibility with existing large fleets of 567 engines. In addi- tion, EMD never redesigned the “dual fuel” diesel and natural gas version of the 16-567CDF Roots blower engine to a 645 equivalent due to the very limited commer- cial market for the engines. The 16-567CDF continued to be built as a 567 using the newer 645 crankcases. The 645 engine also continued


in production long past the 1980 introduction of the successor 710 engine. As late as the mid-1990s, EMD continued to build the 645 for marine, industrial, and mili- tary applications requiring addi- tional 645s to match previously delivered equipment. Production included engines built for the nu- clear industry and for use on air- craft carriers.


434H The engineer’s side of the unit showed the new dynamic brake bulge with the extended range relay access door. Note that this unit had low brake cylinder Flexicoil trucks but no flared ra- diator section. The unit is seen at Enola, Penn- sylvania, on January 23, 1966. — Louis A. Marre collection


434E Looking much like a pro- duction SD45, this rear shot clearly shows the flared radiator section. — J. David Ingles photo, Louis A. Marre collection


3,000 HP A brand-new 16-645 ma- rine engine is ready for shipment to a customer. The 645 series remained in production for marine and industrial custom- ers for many years after it had been replaced by the 710 in the locomo- tive product line. — EMD photo, author’s collec- tion


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