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wall cap above the east end portal was fabricated by heating pieces of styrene in a 250-degree oven and quickly bending them around a form of the proper diameter. I fastened everything together with epoxy and filled any minor gaps between parts with modeler’s putty. The tunnels have dates of 1912


and 1913 cast into recesses on the face of the portals. I carefully cut these recesses into the resin using a hobby knife and small chisels. I mounted 2mm plastic numerals from Slater’s Plasticard (a British company I found on the internet — Plastruct makes the same nu- merals) on strips of styrene and glued them into the recesses. The faces of the tunnel portals


are marked by a number of part- ing lines where the various pours of concrete joined each other. Us-


ing prototype photographs as a guide, I cut the parting lines with a hobby knife and scrapers. One of the portal faces also showed chip- ping where the roof of the tunnel was damaged, which I simulated using a knife and files. Six downspouts carried water


from behind the portals to the ground. These were made of stan- dard lengths of six-inch cast iron sewer pipe. I had some resin cast- ings of appropriate piping, but one package was not enough for this project. I could not determine who made the pipe castings, so I fabricated more from various siz- es of styrene rod and tubing. Photos of the tunnels show


small pins embedded in the con- crete that were put in place to hold the wooden forms for the concrete during construction. These pins were cut off, but over the years


have rusted and become visible. I resisted my obsessive-compulsive urges and decided not to model these pins and rust stains. The finished tunnel liners and


portals were washed and primed with a coat of gray automotive primer and then airbrushed with Floquil Aged Concrete. The yellow tone of the Aged Concrete was a bit too pronounced for my taste, so I oversprayed it with a thin coat of light gray to tone it down. I sprayed thinned black paint on the roof of the tunnels and on the face of the portals to simulate the effects of locomotive exhaust. The Oscawana tunnels are


now painted and installed on my layout. After the track through the tunnels is ballasted, they will be permanently installed and surrounded with rocks and scenery.


SEPTEMBER 2015 63


Detail The finished tunnel portals have excellent detail. Note the board- formed indentions typi- cal of concrete casting of this era. The downspouts also add an interesting detail to the structure.


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