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main line track and 21 miles of indus- trial sidings. A&BB handled thousands of carloads for almost all the major in- dustries in Akron and had nearly 100 employees. A&BB was nationalized during World


War I, but the railroad returned to inde- pendent management under the control of the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1920. In 1965, management was assigned to the ACY, which by then handled most of the A&BB traffic. By the 1980s, plant closings, econom-


ic downturns, and highway competition severely limited the railroad’s loadings. The railroad’s operations had dwindled to a single crew and one locomotive. In 1994, Wheeling & Lake Erie subsidiary Akron Barberton Custer Railway (ABC) took over the A&BB. Morning Sun’s new book illustrates


ACY and A&BB with excellent color photos showing all the various aspects of their equipment and operation. The majority of the photos cover ACY, with a vast amount of material showing the various yards and industries it served. Track plans of some of the installations will help the modeler design a model


of this road. A full roster of both steam and diesel locomotives along with ex- cellent photos show how AC&Y evolved over its lifetime. The diesel photos in- clude leased units, as well as N&W pow- er. The railroad had an extensive Fair- banks-Morse stable, which is covered in detail. ACY’s freight, passenger, and non- revenue equipment is shown in various liveries. The book includes an impres- sive roster of all the ACY cabooses, from wood cars in the 1920s to steel caboos- es from various makers, including the N&W shops. The same detail is provid- ed with a roster of all the depots along the line listed by milepost locations. Various building types are illustrated. The authors provide a condensed


look at the 23-mile Akron & Barber- ton Belt. A&BB’s steam roster included mostly 0-6-0 switchers and a number of 2-6-0 Moguls built around the turn of the century. A&BB’s diesel fleet began with a few Baldwin and BLHW units, but most were small, leased EMD units, includ- ing Geeps and SWs. With no stations or freight equipment, the balance of


the A&BB section covers its cabooses and various terminals and industrial customers. I found this a surprising and compel-


ling book to read. The author explains how industrial and transfer railroads handle their chores and operational problems. Well-written text and infor- mative photo captions describe what you are seeing and how it is significant to the railroad’s day-to-day operations. This book should appeal to everyone interested in Midwest railroading, and it will be a joy for those who especial- ly like small industrial lines. — DENIS DUNNING


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