This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
• The yard and port of Coos


Bay, Oregon, are modeled com- plete with scale ships.


“Railblazer” Fortunately, the U.S. Forest Service quelled a small forest fire near Quartz that threatened the OC&E tall timber tres- tle, Bridge 4, just below Reload 2 at East Quartz. Some of the pines show signs of bark beetle kill, making them even more vulnerable to fire. The Railblazer, Train 141, with SP GP35 4822 in the lead makes its way at re- stricted speed across the trestle as the last embers are extinguished.


The Concept The home road for the Colo-


rado Model Railroad Museum is the Oregon, California & East- ern — a prototype logging rail- road that ceased operations in 1990. As a logging operation, the real OC&E began in Klamath Falls, Oregon, and then headed 65 miles east-northeast through Dairy, Sprague River, Sycan, and Bly. Construction com- menced on the OC&E in 1915 with completion to Bly in 1928. Great Northern owned 50 per- cent of OC&E. After 1933, the OC&E was alternately operated by Great Northern and Southern Pacific. In 1975, Weyerhaeuser Lumber Company purchased


the entire railroad. Operations ceased in 1990 with scrapping completed in 1993. Though the model OC&E


follows the real railroad in a general sense, the model in- cludes a fictional single-track CTC-dispatched bridge line. This route handled traffic and trains from Burlington North- ern (Great Northern), South- ern Pacific, Western Pacific, and Weyerhaeuser Lumber in the fall of 1975, much like the real Inside Gateway did for BN and WP. Rather than terminating at Bly, the model continues east to Lakeview, Oregon, where trains are handed off to SP’s Modoc line.


Construction After erecting the building’s outer shell, attention turned to


the layout. The structure was specifically designed to house the large 60x96-foot layout and display of railroad artifacts. The concrete floors received special consideration, especially where to strategically place duck-under pits to allow volunteers to follow their train without ducking un- der the benchwork or walking long distances around islands. You can imagine the concrete workers scratching their heads about the stairways to nowhere! The basic benchwork is L-gird- er on open grids with ¾-inch plywood subroadbed and cork roadbed with N-scale roadbed used for secondary trackage. The track is all flex track


with Code 100 used in staging, Code 83 on the main line, and Code 70 for secondary and yard tracks. The minimum radius is


42 RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


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