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A WORLD IN ONE COUNTRY


but Canada’s main cities also offer plenty of opportunities for a little retail therapy. In Toronto you will find both retro-bargain and upscale couture. The city's main modern retail hub is the Eaton Centre on the central Yonge Street. The glass galleria presides over 230-plus retailers and restaurants like Abercrombie and Fitch, Bench, Michael Korrs, Hollister and Canadian apparel favourite, Roots. Or browse the second-largest Chinatown in North America for exotic trinkets and jewellery. Adjacent to Chinatown, Kensington Market has a plethora of retro shops, cheap and used clothing stores, cool cafés, furniture shops, great restaurants, a variety of ethnic and organic produce stores and one of


Canada's few cannabis cafés. BOOK IT Cosmos Tours and Cruises has a nine-day Cities of Eastern Canada tour that includes two nights at the Chelsea Hotel in Toronto. Prices


are from £1484pp for a holiday in June (2015). cosmostoursandcruises.co.uk


IF YOUR CLIENTS LOVED... TIGER WATCHING IN INDIA OR LEOPARD SPOTTING IN SRI LANKA THEN SUGGEST WALKING WITH POLAR BEARS IN CHURCHILL


– if only for some great photos – will have tempted many a client to the African bush, yet Canada is second to none when it comes to taking a walk on the wild side. See bears at Knight Inlet Lodge, British Columbia, between April and October. Also in BC, Spirit Bear Lodge is one of the few places you can see white bears – actually black bears but white because of a rare recessive gene. The lodge is First Nation owned and operated and its décor is in keeping with the culture. The whale-watching season runs from June


to September, with the best sightings in British Columbia and Atlantic Canada. Other wildlife- viewing opportunities include wolves in Québec (April-October) and the bald eagle migration in


British Columbia (April-October). BOOK IT Canadian Affair has season specific packages


to spot Canada’s own 'big five': bears, whales, wolves, moose and eagles. Prices from £1,065pp for a whale-watching trip to BC and £679pp for three days and two nights' bear and wildlife watching at Knight Inlet Lodge (not including international flights). canadianaffair.com


IF YOUR CLIENTS LOVED...


A SHOPPING BREAK IN NEW YORK THEN SELL THEM TORONTO


The Big Apple has long attracted bargain hunters SELLING CANADA SPRING/SUMMER 2015 19


It's no wonder Churchill, Manitoba, is known as the ‘Polar Bear Capital of the World’. Each fall around 900 of the snowy-white bears congregate to wait for the Hudson Bay to freeze. October and November are the key months for polar bear viewing. Most guests fly from Winnipeg to Churchill where they take a Tundra Buggy out to view the bears. More remote lodges can be accessed via a fixed- wing float plane which takes visitors up the rugged Hudson Bay coast to the most exclusive polar bear viewing properties. Activities here include easy- paced walking tours geared towards maximising


IF YOUR CLIENTS LOVED...


LONG TRAIN JOURNEYS ON THE GHAN IN AUSTRALIA OR THE BLUE TRAIN IN SOUTH AFRICA SUGGEST THE CANADIAN


Few other nationalities enjoy the romance and timeless elegance of train travel like the Brits do. Luxury and a window with a view is offered by the Rocky Mountaineer which travels between Vancouver and Jasper, and other points in-between. But for an extended window seat on Canada’s ever-changing scenery, and a bed for the night – or several nights – consider Via Rail’s The Canadian. The train rumbles between Toronto and Vancouver and those who stay for the duration will see – over four nights and three days – lakes in Northern Ontario, lush boreal


forest, the western Prairies and the Rocky Mountains. BOOK IT Prices start from £944pp (based on Sleeper Plus in a cabin). For booking details visit viarail.ca or the UK GSA,1st Rail, on 0161 888 5636; or 1strail.co.uk


Shopping in Toronto


"STOP FOR A LOBSTER LUNCH IN ST ANDREWS AFTER VIEWING THE FOUR-STOREY HIGH FLOWERPOT-SHAPED HOPEWELL ROCKS"


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