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Figure 1 Heat image of a power case as recorded by the Fluke TI-400.


package or specify an external cooling requirement, especially for processors. Many components, such as LEDs, require heat sinks. Wakefield offers heat sinks in many shapes and sizes to suit a broad range of requirements. One example is the Wakefield 882 series radial‐fin heat sink, which is specifically designed to work with LED packages.


Heat sinks come in many


different materials, some of which might not physically appear to be heat‐ conductive because of the thinness of the material. Trimmable graphite sheets, which insulate electronics from heat sources and disperse heat much like heat sinks, are lightweight and are not bulky. Panasonic Electronic Components’ PGS thermal graphite sheets are ideal for space‐limited areas or to provide supplemental heat sinking to existing areas.


In a way, thermal


management is an insurance policy for maintaining quality because it prevents damage, which can cause poor performance. Poor performance then would be blamed on the device, not the fact that the device got too hot. Luckily, there’s a plethora of products to help ensure good thermal protection. A top‐level category in the Products section at www.mouser.com called ‘Thermal Management’ contains thousands of products from which to choose. Within all of these products lies a combination point of price and value that can significantly increase the overall quality of a product, reduce failures and save labor costs, without breaking the budget.


www.mouser.com July/August 2014 27


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