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AFS NEWS


AFS NEWS


AFS, Metalcasting to Play Key Roles in Two of Obama’s


“ I’m very satisfi ed with


my long-term print advertis- ing program in MCDP—it’s the only advertising I do. It gives me great visibility and name recognition, both with existing customers and with new ones. And the steady fl ow of new business it brings in easily justifi es the investment.





Kevin Evers President St. Louis Precision Casting


Manufacturing Institutes AFS has signifi cant roles in two major manufacturing


initiatives announced in February by President Obama as part of his National Network for Manufacturing Innovation. T e new programs are backed by more than $300 million of public and private funds and aim to propel American manufacturing forward by bringing together product developers, research- ers, manufacturers, universities and training institutions into regional hubs. T e hubs will connect private businesses with research institutions to advance high tech manufacturing. AFS has been closely involved in initiatives like these to


partner with the private sector to boost advanced manufactur- ing, strengthen our capabilities for defense, and attract the types of high quality jobs a growing middle class requires. “T e impact of these large-scale manufacturing initia-


tives on metalcasting will be unprecedented for the indus- try,” said AFS Vice President of Technical Services Tom Prucha. “We will have an immense opportunity to secure the future of the metalcasting industry for generations, and AFS is proud to be part of that milestone.” One of the two manufacturing hubs President Obama announced Feb. 25 is the American Lightweight Materials Manufacturing Innovation Institute (ALMMII) based in Canton Township, Mich. It will focus on the manufacture of aluminum, titanium and high strength steel, while work- ing with universities and labs on research and development. AFS is part of a consortium of 34 companies, nine universi- ties and 17 other groups, including Boeing, General Electric and Ohio State University, pledged to work together to pio- neer lightweight, high performing metals and alloys while developing the skills and training needed for production. ALMMII was awarded $70 million from the Depart- ment of Defense on Feb. 25, with matching funds from the consortium partners. T e institute is expected to create in excess of 10,000 new jobs in metal manufacturing, including casting, metal stamping, metalworking and machining. It also will add 100 metal related engineering jobs per year and 1,000 skilled trade workers. T e President also announced Digital Labs for Manu-


facturing (or Digital Lab) will receive $70 million from the Department of Defense as part of the National Network for Manufacuring Innovations. Led by UI Labs out of the Chicago area, Digital Lab will bring together manufactur- ing and software companies from Boeing to GE to develop compatible software and hardware for supply chains to reduce manufacturing costs. AFS will work with the other partners at the new Digital Lab to solve century-old manu- facturing dilemmas while utilizing the most state-of-the-art technology available with supercomputers and big data. “AFS is thrilled with its role in the President’s new


METALCASTINGDESIGN.COM 86 | MODERN CASTING March 2014


manufacturing initiatives,” said AFS CEO Jerry Call. “By convening titans of industry and academia in each of these hubs, we can keep metalcasting in the conversation about the future of our country.”


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