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Workshops


Wednesday, April 9 8:45 a.m.


Roadmap to Sustainability (14-152)


Dana Cooper, Fairmount Minerals, Benton Harbor, Mich.; John Bradburn, General Motors, Warren, Mich.; Bryant Esch, Waupaca, Waupaca, Wis.; Jeff Ze- men and Mellisa Mooren, Kohler, Kohler, Wis.; Cora Lee Mooney, Brown Flynn, Highland Heights, Ohio Tis workshop will explore how


to embrace sustainability for smarter innovation and profitable growth. “People, Planet and Profit” succinctly describes the triple bottom line ap- proach and goal of sustainability. A panel of speakers will outline these goals and moderate roundtable discus- sions culminating in the development of a roadmap for completing sustain- ability reporting.


2:00 p.m.


The Price of Trust: Increasing Safety Through Leadership Development (14-148)


Geordie Aitken, Aitken Leadership Group, Nanoose Bay, British Colum- bia, Canada; Paul Lynes, Finger Lynes Engineering, Nashville, Tenn.; Tomas Slavin, Slavin OSH Group LLC, Chicago; Pat Boddy, RDG USA, Des Moines, Iowa Running a successful metalcasting


facility is hard, but the skills needed for long-term performance are “soft.” It’s this “soft” stuff that foundry lead- ers struggle with the most: motivation, behavior and values. Tough hard to measure, they always end up affect- ing the bottom line. Nowhere is this more true than in the area of work- place safety. In a technical industry like metalcasting, most managers and leaders have no formal training in leading people. In this session, partici- pants will learn how organizational values and behaviors can be shifted and business-critical outcomes like safety can be influenced by increas- ing leadership capacity in the “soft


March 2014 MODERN CASTING | 61


skills.” Session participants can use an organizational “Values Scan” to “rank” their own companies on certain “soft” aspects of culture and behavior. Tools will be presented to link the “hard” aspects of a business (strategy, money, organizational structure, etc.) with the “soft” aspects (values, behaviors, personal context, etc.). Te session will offer a roadmap for building leader- ship capacity.


2:00 p.m.


Additive Manufacturing for Metal Casting Applications (14-077)


Sheila Dickey, John Deere Foundry Waterloo, Waterloo, Iowa; Keith Gerber and Dave Rittmeyer, Hoosier Pattern, Decatur, Ind.; Rick Lucas, Te ExOne


Company, North Huntingdon, Pa.; Brandon Lamoncha and Bronson Lamoncha, Humtown Products, Co- lumbiana, Ohio; Jerry Tiel, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 3-D printing of molds is here to


stay. Developments have brought the technology into the main- stream of metalcasting, and equip- ment prices put it within the reach of many. 3-D printing has been used for the production of cast- ings in applications ranging from prototyping parts within hours to recreating antique automotive parts. The panel will discuss the state of the technology, basic de- sign freedom and current programs to utilize the technology.


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