This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Technology | thermoplastic composites The latest technology innovations in thermoplastic composite


processing could fi nally see these high performance materials fi nd their place in large series applications. Peter Mapleston reports


Composites shape the future


A revolution of sorts began some 20 years ago when Audi began producing cars with ‘hybrid’ front-end carriers—metal pressings over-moulded with a glass reinforced polyamide using technology developed by Bayer. Hybrid technology combined the best aspects of plastics and metals: the strength of the latter with the mouldability of the former. The revolution is now entering a new phase: the


plastics industry is fi nding ways to do without sheet metal all together in many structural parts. Visitors to K2013 were able to see several demonstrations of how very strong parts can be produced quickly in highly integrated injection moulding production cells that put the manufactur- ing of thermoplastics compos- ite parts fi rmly in the large-


www.injectionworld.com


series industrial arena. This integration has enabled the conversion of preforms into 3D inserts and the over- moulding process to be carried out in one minute or less—very important for applications in the automotive industry.


“Thermoplastic composites will replace plastics-


metal hybrids, for sure,” says Christian Götze, head of development at Swiss mould maker Georg Kaufmann Formenbau (GK) , which has taken a leading role in developing thermoplastic composite (TPC) injection moulding processing


technology. TPCs may not replace metals everywhere, he says, but certainly will in many applications where, until now, sheet metal has been consid- ered indispensable. At K2013, GK moulds were


Main image: A LIPA state- of-the-art TPC production


cell at Swiss mouldmaker Georg


Kaufmann Left: BASF’s


new Ultracom TPCs used by Johnson


Controls in this prototype


automotive seat-back


January/February 2014 | INJECTION WORLD 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64