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markets | Machinery


Euromap core plastics and rubber machinery exports 2012 by destination country. Total €9.3bn


Near and Middle East 4.0%


Rest of the world 13.7%


Europe 40.7%


Americas 19.4%


ment and changing equipment. Euromap recommenda- tions can be downloaded from the organisation’s website here http://bit.ly/EuromapDocs.


Secretary general Thorsten Kühmann said at K that the view within the machinery industry around the world of standardisation is changing away from viewing machine standards as a way of closing off and protecting markets to one of them providing the means to open them up.


Source: Euromap/ national statistical offi ces


India 2.6%


China 10.3%


Asia 9.3%


mendation for measuring the energy effi ciency of injection moulding machines, which lays down methods for determining machine-related and product related energy consumption and has introduced a similar recommendation – TR46 – covering energy effi ciency of extrusion blow moulding machines.


The association recently revised the Euromap 12, 62, 67, 67.1 and 67.2 recommendations covering plug-in interfaces for handling, automation and mould move-


“If we are to export to other countries we need a level playing fi eld and we are pleased this is not only the view of us [at Euromap] but also of many Asian producers. So one year ago we came together with the US, China and Japan and said ‘Lets go to a global level of standardisation,’” said Kühmann.


The result of this initiative was the formation last


year of the Technical Committee ISO/TC 270, which aims to develop globally relvant safety standards for plastics machinery. “This is for the benefi t of all countries – there is no reason why one should have a different standard. We are starting with injection moulding machines,” said Kühmann  www.euromap.org


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