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about creating pieces with human hair and the hair of their family members who had passed away,” she said. “At first I said no, but then as I was asked more I


thought there must be a place for it in the market.” Rebecca also creates art works with the


footprints and handprints of young children, and was also asked about transferring those to items of jewellery as a memorial too. Rebecca saw a gap in the market, and having


already honed her skills in the art of jewellery making, set up Jewellery Memories to make the personal, unique pieces that were wanted to remember people that had died. “I saw that there was clearly a market for the designs I had in mind, but I knew that the pieces needed to be different from the more traditional, old-fashioned style of mourning jewellery,” Rebecca said. “In the past, mourning jewellery was very


ornate and quite over-the-top – very different from tastes now. “The people who were approaching me


wanted something far simpler, something that wasn’t too much; they wanted something they could wear that wouldn’t be too obvious to others. They just wanted a nice piece of jewellery that had a deeply personal meaning, just for them. “I wanted to dispel this image that people had about mourning jewellery and create pieces that people could wear all the time and did not attract uncomfortable questions from others. “In many cases, the jewellery is just for the


wearer to take comfort in, knowing that they have a little piece of their loved one with them, knowing that they could go where they went.” Rebecca attended courses at the London


School of Jewellery in silver and gold smithing, impression jewellery, resin and glass work, helping her develop her skills across a range of areas. However, Rebecca said: “The art of jewellery


making really is a lot of practice. You learn a skill, practice it a thousand times and then you might be ready to make a piece for a customer.” All the pieces Rebecca makes are created in her studio in Hertfordshire and are completed within 28 days of her receiving the prints or hair to be used in the item of jewellery, but many are ready within 14 days. Larger silver pieces and all pieces made from


gold are hallmarked with Rebecca’s personal hallmark at the London Assay office, so you can be assured of the quality and purity of each item. She said: “All the pieces are made to order and


are handmade by me. Every piece is perfect and personalised for each person.” Rebecca can make pieces in sterling silver and nine or 18 carat yellow, white or rose gold. Hair, cremation ashes, footprints, handprints,


fingerprints, signatures and photographs can all be used on the jewellery items and can be made into necklace pendants, bracelets, key rings, cufflinks and rings. For more information about Rebecca’s


creations, visit www.jewellery-memories.com or call 01438 880936.


Farewell Magazine


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