This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Cannon Goes Light With Steel Alloy


Steel’s high yield strength and tolerance of deflection without damage helped keep the weight low in a 15-piece fabrication to casting conversion. GARY BURROW, HA BURROW PATTERN WORKS INC., SILESIA, MONTANA


for integration into faster, more agile military land vehicles. Castings are well established in the private sector to reduce weight in cars and trucks while increasing structural performance, but they are underutilized in military applications. High performance speci- fications, while challenging, are not the primary reason for this underuti- lization; rather, it is the long leadtime


E


A U.S. Marine drives an M1A1 Abrams tank ashore. The XM360 cannon is being redeveloped for the next generation Abrams tank.


merging designs for U.S. Army cannons are required to be smaller and lighter


typically required to fully comply with the military’s dimensional, surface integrity and internal integrity require- ments. Te deflector tray casting for the Army’s XM360 cannon (which is being redeveloped into the XM360E1 for the next M1 Abrams tank upgrade) is a success story illustrat- ing how casting design was integrated with manufacturing engineering to transcend the usual outcomes of delays and cost overruns. Te integration of the casting process, casting finish-


ing processes and machining of the rough casting resulted in an approved finished component 110 days from the Army’s order date to approval. Te deflector tray is both struc-


tural and functional. Te tray guides a new projectile into the cannon’s breech and deflects the spent casing into a holding area after the projectile is fired through the barrel. Due to force and surface wear resistance, a steel alloy is required. Steel castings are renowned for structural toughness


23


July 2013 MODERN CASTING | 23


U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Daniel V. Gonzales.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60