This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
IN A WORLD WITHOUT CASTINGS


Would Early Americans Have Been Cozy in Winter?


T e potbelly stove, based on improvements to Benjamin Frank- lin’s metal-lined fi replace, the “Franklin Stove,” became a popular


wood-burning heat source in the United States during the 1800s. Frank- lin’s original design dramatically reduced heat loss through the chimney, as well as the amount of wood burned and the smoke emitted. T e hot iron also continued to heat a room after the fi re had gone out. He chose not to patent the invention, and various manufacturers continued to develop the technology. Freestanding potbelly iron stoves were cast in various sizes, and


features for cooking, safety and cleaning were added, as well as decora- tive embellishments. Although the iron stoves could weigh up to several hundred pounds, they and their ventilation stovepipes were easily transported and gave off a signifi cant amount of radiant heat. T ey proliferated in homes, town halls, general stores, schoolhouses,


railway stations, rail cars and other gathering places across the country. Many antique examples are still functioning, and the stoves continue to be manufactured today.


July 2013 MODERN CASTING | 17


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60