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In the Nacogdoches cleaning room, workers perform fin grinding and trim operations.


at Nacogdoches, recordables were reduced by half. On a weekly basis, they also evaluate first aid incidents and near misses. “Our goal is zero accidents, so


we’ve taken it down to, for example, if you scrape yourself, no matter how insignificant you may feel that it is, we want it reported,” said Goodling. “Maintenance men might have a scrape on their hands now and then as part of their job, but if there’s any- thing we can uncover through that investigation of how that occurred, we can try to stop that from happen- ing, going forward.” “If you see something every day,


you get accustomed to, ‘Tat’s the way it is’—right, wrong or indiffer- ent,” said Martin. “An outside set of eyes can point out some things, and we encourage our associates to


22 | MODERN CASTING July 2013


talk to each other, because we’ve got smart people here and we need their ideas and for them to tell us. If you do a job every day, you know a lot more about that job than even the manager.” Shortcuts are not acceptable, and violating a safety policy is a termi- nable offense. NIBCO recently expanded its health and wellness initiatives. Alice Martin, vice chairman and chief people officer, spearheads these pro- grams, which are a natural extension to the company’s safety focus. “We are working on putting


our own onsite workout facili- ties with state-of-the-art equip- ment at every site, which will be complete by the end of 2013,” she said. “Additionally, every NIBCO location is tobacco free, but we are


most proud of the smoking cessa- tion contests we have completed in which 66 associates and their family members quit using tobacco. We want them to go home in bet- ter condition than when they came to work.” Safety is discussed at the begin- ning and end of every meeting, and new associates are indoctrinated with it before they start. “We’re not going to assume you know anything. We’re going to give you the training you need to do the job, and if you don’t know how to do something, we don’t want you to do it—we want you to ask,” Goodling said. “Without the people in the plant changing the ways they action things on the floor, we’d never have been able to make the great strides we have in safety.”


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