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Mourning a loss N


ortheast Oklahoma Electric Coopera-


tive bid farewell to a dear friend May 15, 2013, with the passing of Johnnie Norman. Norman was 81.


Norman joined the cooperative May 24, 1954, at the age


of 22. He spent his entire career with NEOEC as the Direc- tor of Marketing/Public Relations. His was a familiar face throughout northeast Oklahoma as he promoted the coop- erative and advised members on wise power use. He retired August 7, 1998. Norman was born in Picher, Oklahoma. Upon gradua-


tion from high school, he proceeded to earn an Associate’s Degree from Oklahoma State University. He served in the United States Army from 1950-1953. Always active within the community, Norman served as


Sargent of Arms for the House of Representatives for eight years. He was a 32nd Degree Mason, a former Worshipful Master, member of the Akdar Shrine, Order of the Eastern Star, where he served as Grand Representative to the District of Colombia for the State of Oklahoma. He was a 50-year member of the American Legion Dale Peace Post #40, VFW, and was a Kentucky Colonel. Survivors include wife Jeanie Norman of the home, chil-


dren: Michael Norman and wife Ruthie of Atlanta, Georgia; Seth Ann Lawson and husband Bill of Ketchum, Oklahoma; Tiana Tucker and husband Eubert of Vinita, Oklahoma; and Chris Norman and wife Jenny of O’Fallon, Missouri; step-children: Robert Dry and Rebecca Cupp of Langley, Oklahoma; ten grandchildren, one great grand-child; and brother Jerry Norman of Corpus Christi, Texas. He is preced- ed in death by Julia Norman Scott and brother Toby Norman. Arrangements were handled by Luginbuel Funeral Home,


Vinita, Oklahoma. Online condolences may be made at www. honoringmemories.com. Current and former cooperative employees shared mem-


ories of Johnnie: Hope White: “I will never forget my job interview with


Johnnie Norman when I applied for the communications spe- cialist position at the cooperative. He started the conversation by mentioning absolutely every negative aspect of the job— long hours, demanding tasks, dealing with the public, meet- ing deadlines and more. I seriously do not think he wanted to hire me; however, he decided to take the chance on me and offered me the job.


6 - Northeast Connection


Northeast Oklahoma loses a cooperative champion with the passing of Johnnie Norman


“I worked with Johnnie for seven of the nine years I was


with NEOEC and, although we may not always have seen eye-to-eye, I respected him and we had a wonderful working relationship. Johnnie was a great PR man, and most of what I learned about public relations and marketing can be credited to his guidance and leadership. “Johnnie had a very distinctive laugh, which I am sure


will be sorely missed by his family and friends.” Jason Palmer: “I can remember going out with Jonnie


to set up for various meetings throughout our communities. Johnnie seemed to always enjoy his work and always had a smile on his face. I can still hear Johnnie laughing. He had an unmistakable laugh. I really enjoyed working with Johnnie. He will be missed.” Kim Bates: “I got to help Johnnie several years during


FFA Banquets. I attended several banquets over the years, taking pictures for him and presenting donations to the local chapters. Te cooperative used to have a room down- stairs dedicated to developing film and he taught me how to develop film and pictures the old-fashioned way and that was something I really enjoyed doing. Johnnie’s office was right across the hall from the engineering department and he would come over and give the girls in engineering grief all the time. I don’t think there was anyone in the four-state area who didn’t know Johnnie Norman.” Dee Ann Grapevine: “Johnnie was always very nice to


me. I can still remember his laugh. Johnnie was the first one to rope me into cooking at the calf fry. I had never eaten or cooked calf fries before that.” Susanne Frost: “Johnnie loved the cooperative and al-


ways had a good word for the cooperative and its employees.” Larry Love: “Johnnie and I traveled a lot and we did a


lot of training together. I remember one occasion when we were getting ready to start our satellite television business and needed to speak to our state representative. Our general manager at the time, Robert Tornton, had informed us that congress was about to make a decision that was going to be detrimental to the business. Johnnie made a phone call and the next thing I knew we were sitting in front of Mike Synar. Just that quick. I was just a kid and new to politics at the time and it impressed me that he could just pick up a phone and have an audience with someone of that stature. Tat always stood out to me.” Tank you, Johnnie, for over 40 years of dedication and hard work. You will be missed.


Te class takes a welcome pizza break before enjoying a demonstration of a bucket truck.


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