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C A N A D I A N June 2013


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


A ELECTRALITE By George My first car was a 1955 Ford Crown


Maintenance Involves Annual Inspection of Utility Poles


Maintaining the electric lines that


deliver your electricity includes in- specting the utility poles. Each year around 12,000 poles are inspected. We are beginning that program


once again, and will be concentrating on an area north of U.S. Hwy. 62 from Harrah to Meeker. We will be looking for damaged and/or defective poles. Conducting the inspection is Os-


mose Utilities of Buffalo, N.Y. They will inspect every pole, recording the pole and attachment information. They will also generate a GPS location, sound the pole using a hammer, and bore the pole at ground level, probing for decay and/ or insect damage. Typically, they will reject 2 to


4 percent of the poles they inspect,


marking them for replacement at a later date. Over the following few months, both co-op and construction crews will replace any defective poles. "The pole inspection program is just


another program designed to maintain and improve overall system reliability," says CVEC Manager of Operations Cordis Slaughter. The inspectors will be easily iden-


tifiable, with tools of the trade being carried to each pole, and can provide identification upon request. If you have any questions or con-


cerns about this program or the con- tractors, please call our dispatch center at 405-382-3680. Osmose inspectors will report their location to the co-op weekly.


Victoria. It had been our family car since 1962. In 1968 when I was preparing to go to college (on foot) my Dad handed me the keys and said, “I want you to come home on weekends.” I was never sure if the car was mine or if Dad was just letting me use it. It had hauled a family of seven for all those years over mostly dirt roads (very little gravel in most of Lincoln County then.) So it was not in pristine condition. During my freshman year at college the floor board on the driver’s side finished rusting out. My Dad replaced the floor board with some used sheet metal. It worked fine. During my sophomore year in 1969, my Dad bought me a 1960 Chev- rolet Impala. He paid $300 for it which was a lot of money. The 1955 Ford went back to my Mother. That Chevrolet was a great car after driving that older Ford. However by 1970 and my junior year I had been blessed with several scholar- ships and three very good summer jobs and along with hauling hay every night, I had saved enough money (I thought) to buy a “sportier” car. I found a 1969 Mustang, very sharp and low miles. The price was $1,900. That was more than I had. But undeterred, I went to a friend at the bank and borrowed $700 to allow me to buy the Mustang. All was well. The Chevrolet went to my Mother. In 1972 I graduated from col- lege and was fortunate to get a good job. What does any single, 22-year-old “boy”, with a good job “need”? Of course, a new car and not just any car – a new Corvette is a must, I thought. The dealer wanted $6,000 plus my very sharp 1969 Mustang and I had no money. But the banks did and they were very free with


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