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Tax Benefits Local Schools Electric co-op tax puts nearly $1 million in school coffer


coming up in Kiamichi Country


Apr 13, 2013


Mountain Gate Poker Run 700 2nd Street, Talihina 918-567-3434


Apr 13, 2013


Talihina Indian Festival Powwow Talihina School Gym, Talihina 918-567-2539 or 918-567-2106


Apr 19-20, 2013


Green Frog Festival & Puddle Jump Run Main Street, Wilburton 918-465-2254 or 918-471-8609


Lookin' Late Honobia Bigfoot Conference and Festival


Moon Dog Ranch, Honobia1 918-4580-244-7323


Apr 20-21, 2013


Music on the Mountain Viking & Celtic Festival Heavener Runestone Park 18365 Runestone Road, Heavener 918-653-2241


Apr 27, 2013


Poteau Rotary Wine and Arts Festival 105 Reynolds Avenue, Poteau 918-658-5334 or 918-647-4194


True Grit 5K Run Southeast Expo Center, McAlester 918-420-3976


To publish an event in the Light Post, please submit complete details including date, location, hours of operation, and a contact telephone number or website. Email, fax or mail event information to Todd Minshall at Kiamichi Electric, PO Box 340, Wilburton, Oklahoma 74578. Email: toddm@kiamichielectric.org or FAX to (918) 465-2950.


SCHOOL Albion


Antlers Bokoshe


Buffalo Valley Cameron Canadian Clayton Crowder Fanshaw Frink


Haileyville Hartshorne Haywood Heavener Hodgen Howe


Indianola Keota Kiowa Krebs


Leflore


McAlester McCurtain


6 | march-april 2013 | Light Post K


iamichi Electric Cooperative paid nearly $1 million in gross receipts taxes in 2012 but co-op officials say they aren't complaining.


"This tax helps rural schools in our area, and we feel it is very important for our communities," said Jim Jackson, Kiamichi Electric CEO.


TheOklahoma Tax Commission states the rural electric tax requires electric co-ops in Oklahoma to pay a state tax equal to two percent of the gross receipts from the sale and distribution of electric power during the calendar year.


The Oklahoma Tax Commission allocates the tax to schools based on the number of miles of co-op-owned electric line located in a school district. Ninety-


five percent of the taxes collected are distributed to rural secondary schools.


Historically, electric co-ops have staunchly defended the rural electric tax because it benefits rural schools in their area. In contrast, less than 50 percent of ad valorem taxes make their way to rural schools. With the passage of State Question 766, state education officials say the amount will be even less. SQ 766 exempts intangible property from ad valorem taxation. The exemption, which went into effect on January 1, 2013, was predicted to provide a $50 million tax break for more than 250 companies including AT&T, Cox Communications, OG&E and other utilities and railroad companies. More recent estimates put the figure at close to $100 million. ■


School District Gross Receipts Tax TOTAL


$13,206.87 $0.65


$13,947.46 $23,211.13 $19,307.36 $40,003.96 $2,884.61 $60,590.92 $8,472.49 $8,306.38 $63,324.90 $44,299.89 $9,092.68 $28,766.84 $15,783.65 $12,625.71 $63,495.28 $2,983.19 $61,162.66 $3,873.87 $30,407.91 $3,840.23 $2,393.49


SCHOOL Monroe


Panama Panola


Pittsburg Pocola Poteau


Quinton Red Oak Savanna


Shady Point Spiro


Stringtown Stuart


Talihina Tannehill


Tuskahoma Whitesboro Wilburton Wister


TOTAL


TOTAL


$13,125.72 $23,068.99 $34,881.36 $27,631.03 $1,168.27 $20,126.13 $17,510.31 $22,964.96 $26,468.21 $2,962.58 $48,871.68 $32,174.68 $7,044.46 $12,977.19 $15,861.64 $21,010.26 $27,219.00 $72,379.36 $11,011.02


$970,438.98


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