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NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


April 2013 OAEC releases free digital Legislature app


he Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) recently released Version 1.2 of its free digital legislative guide app that provides an interactive direc- tory of Oklahoma’s Federal and State elected representatives.


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The application, now available for all iOS devices, is a detailed guide for Oklahoma’s 54th Legislative Session that provides infor- mation on each member of the legislature. The app is an essential tool for lobbyists, pro- fessors, and involved constituents, allowing them to quickly access practical information about those elected to represent them. In addition to the detailed profiles, the app also provides robust map features with pin- points to legislative and cooperative districts. (458000001)


Anyone with an iOS device can download the app for free. “It’s a great aid for educa- tors, or for anyone who has an interest in state government,” OAEC Director of Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Kenny Sparks said. The app is intended to enrich the legisla- tive guide and is not intended to replace the printed edition. Printed copies of the legisla- tive guide will still be available. Although the app is designed for iOS devices at this time, OAEC anticipates the release of an Android version in the near future. To download the free app, visit www.oaec.coop or the Apple iTunes Store, or scan the QR code.


Powering Up When an outage occurs, line crews work to pinpoint problems 1


High-Voltage Transmission Lines


Transmission towers and cables that supply power to transmission substations (and thousands of consumers) rarely fail. But when damage occurs, these facilities must be repaired before other parts of the system can operate.


2 Distribution Substation


Each substation serves hundreds or thousands of consumers. When a major outage occurs, line crews inspect substations to determine if problems stem from transmission lines feeding into the substation, the substation itself, or if problems exist down the line.


3 Main Distribution Lines


If the problem cannot be isolated at a distribution substation, distribution lines are checked. These lines carry power to large groups of consumers in communities or housing developments.


5 Individual Homes


If your home remains without power, the service line between a transformer and your residence may need to be repaired. Always call to report an outage to help line crews isolate these local issues.


4 Tap Lines


If local outages persist, supply lines, called tap lines, are inspected. These lines deliver power to transformers, either mounted on poles or placed on pads for underground service, outside businesses, schools, and homes.


Tornadoes, ice storms and blizzards. NWEC members have seen it all. And with such severe weather comes power outages. Restoring power after a major outage is a big job that involves much more than throwing a switch or removing a tree from the line. The main goal is to restore power safely to the greatest number of members in the shortest time possible. This illustration shows how power is typically restored after a major disaster.


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