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LIVEWIRE | PAGE 3


Save energy and money with cooperative’s tools


BY JULIANN GRAHAM, Communications Specialist


his time of year, energy bills are at their lowest because the weather doesn’t typically require a lot of heating and cooling to keep temperatures comfortable indoors.


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Once summer hits, Tri-County Electric Cooperative members will see an increase in their electric bills as their air conditioners work to keep their houses cool. Members can get ahead of high bills by using some of the cooperative’s free tools to analyze and reduce their energy use.


In 2011, the cooperative distributed Kill A Watt power meters to public libraries


throughout its service territory. Members are able to check them out anytime. If your local library doesn’t have them or doesn’t have enough of them, call Tri-County Electric to request them.


The Kill A Watt, pictured on this page, works by measuring the electricity appliances use. It shows both kilowatts and dollars. Simply plug your appliance into the device and leave it plugged in for one or two weeks of use. You may be surprised how much your toaster or television costs to run.


The following towns should have Kill A Watts in their libraries: Guymon, Hooker, Goodwell, Beaver, Boise City, Texhoma, and Elkhart, Kan.


Members don’t need a Kill A Watt power meter to obtain estimates of appliance energy use. They can simply go online to www.tcec.coop and go to the ‘Save on My Bill’ page. In the section on Billing Insights and calculators, members will find free calculators for appliances, lighting, space heaters and televisions.


Finally, the best way for members to manage their home energy use is to access the Billing Insights online account analysis. To do so, members need to log in to the online portal at tcec.coop then click ‘Analyze My Bill’ under the ‘My Usage’ menu. After answering a few questions, members can view a customized report of their energy use along with recommend ways to save.


Any questions regarding these tools should be directed to Tri-County Electric at (800) 522-3315 or via email to memberservice@tcec.coop. n


CEO VIEW BY JACK L. PERKINS, CEO


Rena McBee’s story about the Co-op Connections Card and its benefits on page one is fantastic. The best part is that her story isn’t unique. Members often tell us the prescriptions savings on the card has been a tremendous help for them.


As a cooperative, we are owned by our members. Helping you save money and looking out for your best interests rather than the interests of distant stockholders is what sets our electric cooperative apart from other types of utilities.


Our efforts to help members save money go beyond the Co-op Connections Card. We work to stay abreast of the latest cost-effective technology we can provide to you to help you save energy.


The article at left talks about some tools we offer that help you save. The online energy analysis is a great way to discover where your energy dollars are going and find ways to cut costs. The Kill A Watt is a tangible way to see how much energy a certain appliance uses.


Our commitment to community also sets us apart from other utilities. This month we feature our support of Pioneer Days in Guymon. We also support the Cimarron Territory Celebration and Cow Chip Throw in Beaver in April. We sponsor events throughout our service territory all year, it's the cooperative difference.n


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