This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
C A N A D I A N APRIL 2013


Co-op Taxes Support Area Schools


Although co-ops don't pay income tax, we do pay a 2-percent gross receipts tax. It is in lieu of ad-valorem, sales, and other excise taxes. The gross receipt tax is then distributed by the Oklahoma Tax Commission to area school districts based on the miles of co-op power lines within the district.


In 2012 CVEC paid $1,064,068.65 in gross receipt taxes. That amount, coupled with the $440,083.22 paid by WFEC, to- taled over $1,504,151 paid to area schools. The accompanying chart details the taxes paid to each school district in CVEC's service territory.


Cleveland Little Axe


Creek Gypsy Hughes Calvin Dustin


Holdenville Moss


Wetumka


Lincoln Chandler Davenport Meeker


Prague


Stroud Wellston White Rock


McIntosh Checotah Eufaula


Hanna


CVEC WFEC


CVEC


CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC


CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC


CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC


$491.92 20,021.54


55.34 4.10


22,265.71 16,855.91 30,880.53 6,540.54 5,180.11 58,770.58 8,242.95


5,780.11 5,544.39 49,436.32 19,507.64 100,065.55 43,270.36 3,718.13 15,530.45 32.011.96 1,171.69


350.50


40,380.82 61.67


28,051.97 24,543.85


Okfuskee Bearden


Boley


Graham Mason Paden


Weleetka


Oklahoma Harrah Luther


Pottawatomie Asher Bethel


Dale


Earlsboro Grove Macomb


Maud McLoud


N. Rock Creek


Pleasant Grove Shawnee


S. Rock Creek Tecumseh


Wanette Seminole Bowlegs


Butner


Justice Konawa New Lima


Pleasant Grove Sasakwa Seminole Strother


Varnum


Wewoka TOTAL


CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC


CVEC WFEC CVEC


CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC


CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC CVEC CVEC CVEC WFEC CVEC WFEC CVEC


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING l


$14,146.92 26,044.44 3,789.86 8,510.18 1,002.30 8,274.57 43,705.40 12,045.81 4,062.47 19,980.42


23,134.78 1,068.91 932.61


23,704.59 25,332.04 23,269.38 17,055.42 17,410.93 34,285.06 6,663.52 35,147.97 22,919.93 21,367.95 37,083.01 23,343.85 30,050.41 17,369.81 207.02 1,311.80 12,574.81 46,117.88 31,964.57 58,290.95


12,845.37 11,182.46 803.48


29,333.40 5,085.27 40,747.71 6,475.14 13,952.20 12,498.04 13,042.14 59,588.40 14,651.14 36,777.47 14,101.41 25,178.31 9,969.66 7,016.07


$1,504,151.87 Continued on page 2. By George


This electrical capacity and energy we deliver to our customers is provided by Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), a generation and transmission cooperative providing electricity to 19 rural electric distribution cooperatives in the state, covering about 3/4 of rural Oklahoma. WFEC has a diversified elec- tric generation resource mix comprised of coal, natural gas, wind, hydro and purchased power. Today most, if not all. electric utilities understand the desirability of a diversified electric generating fleet. This helps control price volatility and, to a degree, enhances reliability. Diversity is also a hedge against the current 'flavor' of government regulation. Today in Okla- homa, we have several large coal-fired generating plants owned by the electric cooperatives including WFEC, a quasi- state agency (GRDA) and the investor- owned utilities (OG&E and PSO.) I believe all of these coal plants in Okla- homa were built in the 1970s because the Federal government mandated that no more natural gas-fired electric generating plants be built, and the existing gas-fired plants would have to be shut down in the future. In response to what was the 'law of the land,' the Fuel Use Act, electric utilities in Oklahoma and elsewhere began rebuilding their electric generating plants to meet their utility responsibilities in the future. In Oklahoma and elsewhere electric generating utilities built large coal-fired plants to replace these 'banned' gas-fired generators. These replacement coal-fired plants cost about four times as much to build as the gas-fired generators had cost.


But the law was clear. By the early 1980s expensive excess generating capacity was everywhere. And about that time we 'discovered' that maybe the


A ELECTRALITE


L


L


E


Y


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178