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currents ■ Bill Payment Options Bringing It On Home


There’s more than one way to pay your electric bill


Choctaw Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides several convenient bill payment options and payment plans. For more details on any of our payment options, please contact your CEC billing representative at 800-780-6486, or visit www.choctawelectric.coop.


Pay online at www.choctawelectric.coop. Using our secure payment site you can also view your account history, check your account balance, energy usage and more.


The last leg of the electricity journey ends at your meter W


hen electricity flows from high voltage transmission lines into a distribution


substation, it enters the last leg of a long journey that began miles away at the generating plant. “Everything from the distribution substation out to the member’s meter is our responsibility,” said Jim Malone, director of engineering and operations for Choctaw Electric Cooperative(CEC).


That covers a lot. Careful planning and design, as well as ongoing maintenance, repairs, and technological improvements ensure the steady flow of power to CEC homes and businesses. CEC owns 26 substations, and each one is strategically located and outfitted to meet the load needs of that area.


One of the most important functions of a substation is to “step down” the high voltage power coming in from the transmission line, and bring it to an acceptable level for delivery along co-op electric lines. Substations also control the flow of electricity and protect the lines and equipment from damage.


CEC power lines carry from 4,000 to 25,000 volts of electricity—still too high for your home. For final delivery that power must pass through a distribution transformer, which most of us


recognize as the barrel-shaped objects attached to certain electric poles.


Over the past five years, costs for transformers has risen 50 percent; however, these costly devices perform an important function. They convert electricity to the 120/240 volts required by your home.


You may be wondering, why all the transformers? Why can’t electricity be delivered at a usable, less dangerous voltage?


“Keeping voltage high makes for a more efficient delivery with less energy lost,” Malone said.


Even at high voltages over a few hundred miles, as much as 10 percent can be lost. “That’s just one of challenges the electric industry must contend with,” said Malone.


As electricity flows to homes and businesses in southeast Oklahoma, it’s easy to overlook the complicated and costly process it takes to get it there. “From the power plant to our homes is not a simple trip,” Malone added. “There’s a lot of manpower, money and equipment required to bring us lights at the flip of the switch.”


Budget Billing. With this option your energy usage is averaged over 11 months, helping you avoid seasonal high bills .


Automatic Payment Plan. Monthly bill payments are automatically withdrawn from your checking, savings, or credit card account.


After Hours Payments. Choctaw Electric offers a drive through window and/or payment drop box at CEC office locations in Hugo, Idabel and Antlers.


Authorized Payment Locations. Pay your bill at any of the following locations Monday through Friday during regular office hours.


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •


First Bank & Trust, Idabel


McCurtain Co. National Bank, Idabel Choctaw Electric Cooperative, Idabel Idabel National Bank, Idabel First Bank, Antlers


Ameri State Bank, Antlers


Choctaw Electric Cooperative, Antlers First National Bank, Broken Bow First Bank and Trust, Broken Bow McCurtain Co. National Bank, Broken Bow Shamrock Bank, Clayton


Choctaw Electric Cooperative, Hugo First Bank, Hugo


First Bank and Trust, Hochatown First State Bank, Valliant


McCurtain Co. National Bank, Valliant First Bank and Trust, Wright City


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