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February Blizzard Causes Outages Continued from page 1.


storm was in the Elk City, Canute, Carter and Retrop area. The intense storm not only knocked out electric service, it also made it difficult, and in some cases impossible, for NFEC crews to reach those affected areas. “We were able to restore power to only a very few of our consumers on Monday, Feb. 25 because the storm made it impossible for our trucks to roll,” explains Bowdre. “We sent our crews home late Monday evening, but had one employee who was unable to get to his home and had to stay at a residence. We had one bucket truck stranded on Monday and most of the day Tuesday due to the blowing and drifting snow. Fortunately, no one was injured during this massive storm.” Bowdre says NFEC summoned help from two local powerline con- tractors to help restore service to our members as quickly as possible. In addition, bulldozers and tractors provided by several of our coopera- tive members pulled our trucks from area to area so we could get our work done. “We would have been helpless without their assistance and the resto-


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restoration efforts. Kay Electric is headquartered in Blackwell and serves more than 5,600 meters. At the peak of KEC’s outage, about 4,300 consumers were without


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electric service, more than 200 utility poles were down, and more than 200 cross arms had to be replaced. NFEC crews were part of almost 100 linemen who were working to


restore service.


nce electric service was restored to all NFEC members, a crew of six NFEC linemen went to help Kay Electric Co-op with its


ration would have taken much, much longer.”


Service was restored to the last residential consumer late on the night of Wednesday, Feb. 27. Restoration efforts continued on water well and farm accounts, as well as fixing some temporary repairs to the system. “In an event such as this storm, we are reminded of what caring people we serve, and what dedicated people we have working for us,” says NFEC General Manager Scott Cope- land. “The bitter cold temperatures


and 50-mile-per-hour winds made it extremely difficult to be without electric service. But our members were understanding of the obstacles we faced in our efforts to restore their service. Their comments of encour- agement and gratitude helped to bol- ster the morale of our employees who were working long days in extremely challenging situations. The kindness and helpfulness they extended to our employees and the crews here assist- ing us is greatly appreciated.


Lending a Helping Hand


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