This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CREATIVE THOUGHT Healing process I


t’s hard to imagine throughout most of his book, but “hope” is the message of David Fitzpatrick ’88 in Sharp, his memoir of severe mental illness that drove him to cut and burn himself for two decades. After many hospitaliza- tions, living in a halfway house, and outpatient therapy, Fitzpatrick earned a master’s degree,


headed to San Francisco to see James Mandle and to Portland, OR, to see Guy Decker. CINDY PENDLETON 81 SMITH ROAD CHARLTON, MA 01507 CROPEN1985@GMAIL.COM


wrote a book, and holds down a job at a car dealership in Connecticut. When he gives read- ings, he is gratified to offer hope and help to those who come to listen and ask questions, especially about what to do for loved ones who injure themselves. “It was overwhelming at first,” he admits, “but now I like it. Sometimes the question period lasts longer than the reading.” The book plumbs his early relationships with


family, friends, strangers, and himself, not spar- ing readers the details of a disturbing dark side, as well as joyful moments. Although Fitzpat rick’s destructive behaviors started before his time at Skidmore, his psychotic break came as a student, exacerbated by drugs and relationships gone bad. Today he wishes he had fought harder to get more out of college. “It was a beautiful campus and nice people, mixed in with the others, like any place. But I was brutally shy, so I didn’t join groups. It wasn’t Skidmore’s fault,” he says. Recently, he adds, “A former roommate showed up at a reading, and I was glad to see him.” Now productive, married, and within “a circle


of loving family and friends,” Fitzpatrick is work- ing on a piece of fiction and considering a fol- low-up to Sharp, about his recovery. Alhough he still occasionally has the urge to mutilate him- self, the difference is that now he resists. “I’m braver on paper than in person,” he says. “But I think it’s important for people to know that after disintegration, rebuilding is possible.” —Helen S. Edelman ’74


their husbands, enjoyed a really fun “date night” in Boston. Although it had been a while since they’d gotten together, it was like no time at all had passed. Donna also reports that Karen Kells Corby, husband Steve, and boys Will and Sam met up with Donna, husband Edgar, and daugh- ter Georgie for a sailing adventure in New York Harbor on her husband’s J80 sail- boat. While the men sailed, the women (and little girl) had a nice stroll along the Hoboken waterfront and then went to Grimaldi’s pizza—“the best!” Leslie Rose Sposili started a new job at Massachusetts-based Turbine Inc., maker of Lord of the Rings online, Dungeon & Dragons online, and other games. She works on the localization team, helping translate game content into German—she found something cool to do with her German BA from Skidmore! Leslie’s son Dennis attends the Technical University of Garching near Munich, Germany. Jennifer Roche Vilot, husband John, and children Alexandra, 9, and Frank, 7, met Paula Kurata Kuespert, husband Jon, and son Logan, 2, at the Sesame Place, near Philadelphia, in July. Paula was in town visiting her husband’s relatives. She says, “The water park felt wonderful on such a hot day.” Liz Cole Bemiss says her family is great. She and her 16-year-old daughter climbed Mt. Rainier in Washington State and Mt. Elbrus in Russia. It was Liz’s second time on Rainier and her third of the seven summits (and her daughter’s first on both). Now Liz is afraid her daughter “might make it up Everest before her old mom!” They were planning another climb in Argentina in December, and then— “fingers crossed—Denali in June.” Let her know if you’d like to join her. Author and illustrator Tad Hills added another volume to his popular “Duck and Goose” children’s series, published by Schwartz & Wade. Duck and Goose Find a Pumpkin, an oversize board book, debuted at No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list, per his sister Jennifer Hills Mac - Don ald ’81. Tad’s wife, Lee Wade ’81 co- created the Schwartz & Wade imprint at Random House.


’86 42 SCOPE WINTER 2013


Donna Vazquez reports that she and Amy Sullivan ’87, along with


Oak Park, IL, resident Nancy Eiseman


Paul graduated from Soma Institute of Clinical Massage Therapy in 2010. She specializes in craniosacral therapy. Her Web site is lyricalhealing.com. As your new class secretary, I want to thank Anne Chorske Stuzin for her ser - vice in this role since we graduated. CLIFF NELSON 111 PLEASANT RIDGE ROAD HARRISON, NY 10528-1226 CNELSON@NELSONLAWNY.COM


Fame in September. The lacrosse player now lives in Huntington, NY, with wife Jill and daughters Rachel, 14, and Jessica, 11. Gary is cofounder of a private golf company called Tour GCX and recently launched a new apparel brand called Automatic Press. In September Scott Hamilton Kenne -


’87


dy’s new documentary, Fame High, was screened at the San Diego Film Festival, with a Q&A with Scott afterward. Google “fame high” to find the movie’s Web site and Facebook page. CHRISTINE CALLAHAN 686 CHARNWOOD DRIVE WYCKOFF, NJ 07481-1078 201-981-9515 CHRISTINECALLAHAN@ME.COM


’88


Kayce Reagan Hughes is


enjoying life in Nash - ville, TN. Her oldest started college in New York, but “we still have a full house with six at home,” she says. Her clothing line is growing, with stores in Chattanooga and Atlanta. She encourages visits to her Web site, kaycehughes.com. In New York State Bonnie Glass Haus -


N MAY 30–JUNE 2


Gary Rosenberg was inducted into Skidmore’s Athletics Hall of


man was relieved her family made it through Hurricane Sandy safely. She says, “The damage to our neighborhood was severe, and we are now adding a chainsaw and generator to our must-have list. We are so grateful that our damage was on the outside of our home.” They moved into a local hotel and were “feverishly fin- ishing the planning for son Zachary’s bar mitzvah.” BETH SKUDDER 16 JACKSON PLACE DARIEN, CT 06820-2712 BSKUD13@OPTONLINE.NET


’89


Laura Kingsbury Rime got together with the “Broads of


AT WORK


OLIVIA DRAKE


R


E


U


I


O


N


R


E


U


N


I


O


N


‘13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60