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INTERN DAVID SCHLENKER ’13 SURROUNDED BY HIS PUPILS IN NEW DELHI, AND ONE OF THE EVOCATIVE IMAGES THAT RESULTED FROM HIS SUPPLYING THEM WITH CAMERAS AND CREATIVE ENCOURAGEMENT


departments, which forward to the selection committee those project plans that show the most promise to enhance the indi- vidual student’s liberal arts experience. Students whose projects are funded write a reflective report at the end of the summer. Dance professor Debra Fernandez has done some reflecting herself—on her student Katie Wilson ’13, who learned about the world of professional dance with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Com- pany and the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance. Fernandez says, “SEE-Beyond does, in my mind, exactly what its title implies. It gives the students the opportunity to connect the work they are involved in at Skidmore


with a corresponding experience outside the familiar confines of the college.”


Kim Marsella, associate director of academic advising, who directly oversees the program, emphasizes that students are in


FUNDING MATTERS


THE $4,000 STIPENDS for SEE-Beyond participants help close the “participation gap,” according to administrator Corey Freeman- Gallant. He notes that they also support Skidmore’s strategy of making elective experiences like internships available to a broader cross-section of the student body. While 18 percent of Skidmore students were in the “high finan- cial need” group according to federal standards, only 6 percent of students who pursued credit-bearing internships were in this group, and very few engaged in other funded programs in the sum-


mer. By contrast, 29 percent of SEE-Beyond participants were “high financial need” students. SEE-Beyond provides more comprehensive support than some


other internship funds. But fewer students can be sponsored at its higher stipends, which is why college officials are working to raise additional funding for SEE-Beyond and other such programs. “Already the data are compelling,” Freeman-Gallant says. “The


applicant pool is diverse, access is increased, the outcomes are educationally meaningful.” —HSE


“The interdisciplinary education at Skidmore could not be more appropriate for a job where innovation, flexibility, and creativity are necessary.”


charge of arranging their own immersive experiences, which helps them frame a broad context for their academic major and also explore its depths. “The faculty are certainly respon- sive and engaged with students, but not handing them pre- arranged opportunities,” she says. “They’re helping students to see possibilities and in some instances to spark their ideas, but ultimately the proposals are the students’.” Sara Low ’13, an archeology major, lived for six weeks in a two-person tent in New Mexico’s Carson National Forest as part of a group excavating Fort Burgwin. She says, “Even when my back felt like it was breaking, when it was 50 degrees at 5 a.m. and 100 by noon, when I did- n’t think I could dig another 5 centimeters, I would think to myself, ‘I can’t wait to do this again, to become a real archaeol- ogist.’” The SEE-Beyond award made it possible, Low says, “to


g


WINTER 2013 SCOPE 17


PROJECT WHY


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