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CREATIVE THOUGHT Great outdoors “I


wake up every day excited to go to work!” says Ann Macartney Hirvonen ’75, co-pro-


prietor of Lapland Lake Nordic Vacation Center in Northville, N.Y. The year-round resort, in the foothills of the southern Adirondacks, offers plenty for the win- ter sport enthusiast: cross-country skiing, snow- shoeing, tubing, and skating, with lessons and equipment rental and sales available. Visitors can come for a day or stay in one of several cot- tages, which together accommodate up to about 70. During the warm months, lodging guests can swim, kayak or canoe, fish, hike, and mountain bike on the sprawling property.


time, she moved to Vancouver, WA, and started a business. REGINA N. CARBON 706 BOUNTY DRIVE, #603 FOSTER CITY, CA 94404-2609 RCARBON14@GMAIL.COM


Barbara Stokes Layton and John moved from Charlotte, NC, to Hilton Head Island, SC, to live full-time. Bonnie hopes to find some classmates and other alums in the HHI/Bluffton area. NONI REILLY 114 CUSHING AVENUE BOSTON, MA 02125-2033 617-288-2104 NOREEN.REILLY@VERIZON.NET


’75 Combining easy access with old-world charm,


the center has been a local fixture for decades and enjoys a loyal following. “Many, many of our guests have been coming here for years,” the amiable Hirvonen says, “and we have the pleas- ure of getting to know these guests very well and watching their families grow.” An English major who earned an MA in sec-


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ondary education from the State University of New York at Albany, Hirvonen spent six years teaching English in Albany-area schools, was a local news reporter, and did public relations work for an area hospital. As Ann Macartney, she visited Lapland Lake and met its then-sole proprietor, Olavi Hirvonen, a former Olympic cross-country skier. The two recently celebrated their 27th wedding anniversary. Hirvonen oversees a staff that in the winter includes instruction, food service, rental and sales, ticketing, ski patrol, housekeeping, mainte- nance, and bookkeeping. She also handles the center’s multimedia marketing and customer in - quiries, and generally fills in wherever needed. That can make for some very long and busy days, but “when you love what you do and you have a customer base that truly recognizes and appreciates your work, as we do, it makes everything worthwhile.” —PD


union. They concluded that summer with their daughter’s wedding, an event en - joyed by all. Summer 2012 was marked with another milestone: the birth of grand- daughter Ellie to daughter Sara. Meg re - ports, “Ellie’s first trip was to Skane ate les Lake (NY) in August. She met family and friends when we had a celebration of life for my mother, Ellie’s namesake. Even Uncle Jack came from Austin, TX.” Sara is director of planning and mentoring for Tuesday’s Children in Manhasset, NY, and works with families impacted by 9/11. The Wingeraths’ son Jack does de sign work for architects. Meg still enjoys teach- ing art to Malden middle school students; school was closed for two days following Superstorm Sandy. She and Fred were looking forward to having the entire fam- ily for the holidays this year at their home in Winchester, MA. In New Jersey, Dorothy Oertel-Albright notes that she was “affected by Sandy big- time. No power or heat, but safe.” Anestis Symeonides and family moved


’76


back to the US last November; they live in Seattle, WA. He says, “With Greece deteri- orating by the day thanks to a crushing economic and social crisis, it was time to pull the plug and make for the door. The move cost us an arm and a leg, but we are deeply grateful to be here.” In 2011, Anes - tis retired from the US Embassy in Athens after 17 years as a political analyst. Wife Sophia is fully engaged with her growing jewelry-design business (kosmimata.com). Daughter Alexia (Cornell ’10) is pursuing graduate training in restoration work. Daughter Anastasia started college this fall. Rounding out the family is dog Bear, a wolf-husky cross, and “princely cat” Normandie. Eleanor Choukas Anderson was heat-


38 SCOPE WINTER 2013


Meg Steele Wingerath and hus- band Fred enjoyed our last re -


ing her 18th-century Vermont home with a generator after Hurricane Sandy knocked out power. Her new novel Out of Her Sha d - ow, goes like this: “Something more trou- bling than an unhappy marriage calls Rebecca out into a rainy night with no shoes, no plans, and four young children in tow. She arrives unexpectedly at her childhood home...and sets a year of ex - traordinary events into motion.” Reviews say the book “celebrates the feminine connection and its triumph over dark spells.” Eleanor, a clinical psychologist, has been writing fiction, poetry, and music since childhood and has an exten- sive background in theater and dance. Peter Appelbaum sends kudos to the organizers of the “Skidmore men” gather- ing at Reunion last year. He says Alan Braunstein ’75 and Arthur Richardson ’77 spearheaded the effort, and “it was a pleasure to return to campus, see fellow alumni, and help reenergize relationships dormant for so many years.” In Miami, Peter owns an import/export company and travels often. He says Miami “is a good place to practice your Spanish, even if you find that you are slurring your words.” In Brookline, MA, Jerry Katz confirms


that “the ‘early man’ reunion last spring was a blast! I had forgotten how many good buddies I had, not only from our class but in other classes as well.” In Oc - tober he and wife Sidney spent a few days in Chicago, visiting daughters Rochelle ’12, a theater major who landed a part in an independent film, and Laurie, a sopho- more at DePaul University. Jerry devotes much of his time to SCORE, the volunteer business counseling network that is part of the Small Business Administration. He says, “It is a real joy helping businesses get off the ground. My success stories have included a wine and cheese store, pet supply store, and clothing establish- ment. My greater role, though, has been helping clients understand the complexi- ties of going into business and letting them come to the conclusion that per- haps now is not the time to enter the wolf den. For those willing to help, I sug- gest checking out www.score.org.” Sue Flanagan, principal for the West - chester Consulting Group in Washington, DC, had a great visit with Sue McCor - mick while she was in San Francisco giv- ing a paper at the American Public Health Association meetings. After working as a corporate lawyer for many years, Boynton Beach, FL, resident Lori-Nan Kaye says she “finally decided to make the arts my primary focus. I am


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CHARLIE SAMUELS


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